Displaying 1 - 20 of 71 articles

Australians are less likely to see a person with an anxiety disorder as warranting professional help. David Goehring/Flickr

Australians understand depression, so why don’t we ‘get’ anxiety?

Australians have come a long way in understanding depression. Most recognise the symptoms and believe in the value of professional help. But anxiety disorders have been left behind.
Some women are very sensitive to small shifts in hormones, others aren’t. Petras Gagilas/flickr

Chemical messengers: how hormones affect our mood

In recent times, we have learnt more about the connections between the “reproductive” or gonadal hormones and the brain, and how they affect not only women but men as well.
Awareness campaigns encourage perfectionism and unwarranted personal responsibility for events over which new mums may have little control. Pablo Rogat

Fear-based health information makes new mothers anxious

Fear-based messages from practitioners and awareness campaigns encourage perfectionism and unwarranted personal responsibility for events over which new mums may have little control.
A diagnostic label such as borderline personality disorder, with its stigma and propensity to invalidate the person’s suffering, clearly has many negative impacts. madamepsychosis/Flickr

Borderline personality disorder is a hurtful label for real suffering – time we changed it

Diagnostic labels usually describe symptoms, attempt to answer the question of what is wrong, and lead to a treatment plan. But "borderline personality disorder" fails on all three counts.
Usually I feel on edge during flight turbulence but recently I employed several techniques that helped to calm me down. Dawid Cedler

High anxiety: how I use mental exercises to ease my fear of flying

Many who suffer from anxiety tend to blame themselves for their "tricky" brains. Compassion-focused exercises can soothe horrible bouts of anxiety, as they did for me on a recent trip home from Bali.
The process of therapy is challenging and takes courage.

Explainer: what is cognitive behaviour therapy?

If you or someone you care about experience an emotional problem it won't be long before you hear that cognitive behaviour therapy, or CBT, is probably the treatment of choice.
A newborn baby undergoes music therapy at a hospital in Slovakia. The hospital uses music therapy to treat infants who have been separated from their mothers. Petr Josek Snr/Reuters

Healthy songs: the amazing power of music therapy

From serving newborns to treating hospice patients, music can be used in medical and psychological treatment with surprising – and real – results.
People with social anxiety disorder believe they will be rejected when others see how anxious and awkward they are. rashmi ravindran/Flickr

Explainer: what is social anxiety disorder?

Most of us would admit to feeling shy from time to time, or anxious about public speaking: the larger the crowd the greater the terror. It’s also not unusual to feel awkward while making small talk with…
Faced with uncertainty and unpredictability, your brain’s on its way to anxiety. Woman image via

Brains transform remote threats into anxiety

Modern life can feel defined by low-level anxiety swirling through society. Continual reports about terrorism and war. A struggle to stay on top of family finances and hold onto jobs. An onslaught of news…
Race is one way we categorize ourselves among in-groups and out-groups. Hands image via

People like us: how our brains view others

Race-related demonstrations, Title IX disputes, affirmative action court cases, same-sex marriage bans. These issues made headlines in all spheres of the media this year. However, thoughtful articles on…
Worry feeds worry. Images sourced from

Feeling anxious makes it harder to stop feeling anxious

Anxious people tend to perceive their world in a more threatening way. That is, the more anxious a person is, the more likely they are to notice threatening things around them. This is called the threat…

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