Species

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Doing its own thing: the eastern coyote, or coywolf, is a mix of coyote, wolf and dog which has spread across eastern North America. Jonathan Way, www.EasternCoyoteResearch.com

Why the eastern coyote should be a separate species: the ‘coywolf’

A wildlife biologist argues that the canid in eastern North America – known as the eastern coyote, or the coywolf by some – deserves to be classified as a separate species.
One of the several precious giant tortoises recently found on Volcano Wolf, Galápagos Islands. Luciano Beheregaray

How we rediscovered ‘extinct’ giant tortoises in the Galápagos Islands – and how to save them

When 100-year-old giant tortoise Lonesome George died in 2012, the world thought his species was lost forever. We went to the Galápagos Islands looking for 'extinct' tortoises – and we found them.
Fragments of woodland surrounded by cleared land in south west Australia. Google Earth

Unique Australian wildlife risks vanishing as ecosystems suffer death by a thousand cuts

Australia may have reputation for vast areas of wilderness, but in reality the continent's ecosystems have been chopped and diced. Now we need to protect what's left.
Professor Lee Berger from the University of the Witwatersrand holding the skull of Homo Naledi. EPA/Shiraaz Mohamed

Homo naledi may be two million years old (give or take)

The big question being asked is: where does Homo naledi fit in the evolutionary tree? Assessing the similarity or dissimilarity between fossil skulls has provided a possible clue to the answer.
The skull of Homo naledi is built like those of early Homo species but its brain was just more than half the size of the average ancestor from 2 million years ago. SUPPLIED

Homo naledi: determining the age of fossils is not an exact science

Despite claims about its age, puzzling combinations of features from Homo naledi gives it an uncanny resemblance to human beings.
What’s in a name? Plenty, if it is a dinosaur such as the Changyuraptor, a genus of the ‘four-winged’ predatory dinosaur. S. Abramowicz, Dinosaur Institute

Unraveling the mystery of how dinosaurs get their names

A dinosaur's name says something about the dinosaur itself. They are grouped together according to similarities they share, which also indicates their ancestral relationships to one another.
A Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans) in the wild near Melbourne. Raoul Ribot

Colour variability in Crimson Rosellas is linked to a virus

Despite its name, the Crimson Rosella is perhaps Australia’s most colour-variable bird and a cause of this striking and beautiful diversity seems to be a disease that’s potentially deadly to many other…

New sauropod dinosaur species discovered

A new sauropod dinosaur species, Leinkupal laticauda, has been discovered in Argentina. With the exception of Africa, diplodocids…
Leopardus tigrinus can be found in Eastern Amazonia or the dry semi-arid Caatinga. Project Wild Cats of Brazil

One becomes two: genes show Brazilian wild cat is two species

A new species of wild cat in central and north-eastern Brazil has been confirmed, according to a study published today in…
Sorry guys, if you are smaller than 1 mm, you can’t be a species. Microbe World

How small is too small to qualify as a species?

Despite their small size, organisms smaller than thousandth of a metre (1 mm) contribute greatly to biodiversity and ecosystem function. Unfortunately, categorising small organisms, even defining those…

New bird species discovered in Cambodia

A new species of bird has been discovered in Phnom Penh, the a capital city of Cambodia. The Cambodian tailorbird has a distinct…

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