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Articles on Antibodies

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Palak Mehta

Curious Kids: how do vaccines kill viruses?

Vaccines work by teaching your immune system about new viruses. Your immune cells are very clever – they will remember what they learnt, and protect you if you encounter that virus in the future.
Both President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for COVID-19. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Trump is taking the latest in COVID-19 treatments – here’s what doctors know works against the virus

The president and first lady Melania Trump have both tested positive for the coronavirus. Here’s what the physicians and scientists know about the best treatments for the disease it causes.
This antibody adopts a Y-shape. The arms of the Y make up the part of the antibody that binds to the target. ALFRED PASIEKA/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

One small part of a human antibody has the potential to work as a drug for both prevention and therapy of COVID-19

Antibodies are great for neutralizing viruses. But they are big and bulky. Antibody engineers are now creating smaller synthetic antibody-like molecules that may be better for fighting COVID-19.
A lab technician holds a vial of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate during testing at the Chula Vaccine Research Center, run by Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand on May 25, 2020. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Explainer: How clinical trials test COVID-19 vaccines

Will a vaccine for COVID-19 be safe? Animal testing, human clinical trials and post-approval surveillance give us good grounds to believe that a future approved vaccine will work and be safe.
An artist’s impression of antibodies (red and blue) responding to an infection with the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (purple). KTSDESIGN/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY / Getty Images

Declining antibodies and immunity to COVID-19 – why the worry?

If antibody levels drop dramatically after an infection, what does that mean for immunity? An expert explains how B and T cells contribute to immunity and why antibodies don’t tell the full story.
A nurse holds plasma donated by a man who recovered from COVID-19. Guillermo Legaria /Getty Images South America

I’m a lung doctor testing the blood plasma from COVID-19 survivors as a treatment for the sick – a century-old idea that could be a fast track to treatment

In the blood of COVID-19 survivors are antibodies that can defeat SARS-CoV-2. Researchers are testing whether these antibodies can be collected and injected into others to save them from the virus.

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