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Articles sur Parkinson's disease

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Wildfire smoke contains a mixture of toxic pollutants that can be harmful to both the lungs and the brain. Bloomberg Creative/ Bloomberg Creative Photos via Getty Images

Neurotoxins in the environment are damaging human brain health – and more frequent fires and floods may make the problem worse

Pollution from more frequent floods and wildfires – exacerbated by the warming climate – is threatening human health and poses particular risks to the brain.
Ozzy Osbourne and wife Sharon Osbourne after Ozzy received a Golden God Award at the Metal Hammer Golden Gods ceremony in London on June 11, 2018. Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP Photo

Ozzy Osbourne has a type of Parkinson’s disease called Parkin: A neurologist explains

Ozzy Osbourne, famous for biting heads off bats, heavy metal music and a reality TV show, announced he has Parkinson’s disease. A Parkinson’s specialist explains the disease and recent advances.
Speciality drug prices are so high priced that many patients skip or ration them. Ravital/Shutterstock.com

High-priced specialty drugs: Exposing the flaws in the system

High prescription drug costs are a widespread concern for consumers and policymakers. For patients who need specialty drugs, though, the problem is even worse, with no relief in sight.
Neurostimulation is rife with potential and pitfalls. Metamorworks/Shutterstock

Stimulus package: brain stimulation holds huge promise, but is critically under-regulated

From dementia to depression to drug addiction, artificial brain stimulation has been hailed as a landmark medical technology for the future. But safeguards are needed if we want the benefits without the risks.
We knew people with Parkinson’s disease were at heightened risk of developing addictive behaviours like gambling. Our research gives insight into why this is. From shutterstock.com

Why do many people with Parkinson’s disease develop an addiction? We built a virtual casino to find out

About one in six people who take the most common medication for Parkinson’s disease will develop addictive behaviours. We found whether this happens depends on a person’s unique brain structure.
Low blood pressure may cause problems for many older people. Satyrenko/Shutterstock.com

Low blood pressure could be a culprit in dementia, studies suggest

Researchers are looking for ways to determine who’s most at risk for dementia and also ways to detect it early. A scientist who has studied low blood pressure makes a case for a link between the two.

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