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Articles on Boko Haram

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Sixty years after independence, Nigeria has yet to achieve its potential. Shutterstock

Nigeria is still struggling at 60. But hope is still alive

Sixty years after political independence, it is clear that Nigeria has not fulfilled its huge potential, but with a supportive public culture it can transform that into success.
When people need food aid, like these Nigerians, research finds they are more susceptible to extremist recruitment efforts. Olukayode Jaiyeola/NurPhoto via Getty Images

How the coronavirus increases terrorism threats in the developing world

When people are hungry or not sure where their next meal is coming from, they get angry at their governments. This gives terrorist groups opportunities to recruit new members.
Military commanders inspect arms and ammunitions recovered from Boko Haram jihadists. Audu Marte/AFP via Getty Images

Should Nigeria have released Boko Haram suspects?

The re-integration of defectors from terror groups into society is a conundrum governments in conflict situations have to deal with across the world.
Military and government officials supervise the airlift of girls rescued from Boko Haram at Maiduguri Airport. Stringer/EPA

How Boko Haram has evolved over the past ten years

It's been a decade since Boko Haram morphed into a violent, radicalised, Jihadist sect after the death of its founder. Since then it has caused untold harm in Nigeria.
Nigerian soldiers clearing Boko Haram camps in Borno State. The government has contracted private security companies to help. EPA/Stringer

Peeling back the layers on the role of private security companies in Africa

Private military and security companies are increasingly being contracted in Africa. But there are big gaps in understanding their impact.
The New IRA apologized for killing investigative journalist Lyra McKee during a riot in Derry. Reuters/Charles McQuillan

Why do rebel groups apologize?

Organizations try to hide mistakes and evade responsibility, studies show. But two scholars analyzing militant and terrorist groups say they are willing to acknowledge their mistakes – sometimes.

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