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Articles on oilsands

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A tailings pond at an oilsands facility near Fort McMurray, Alta., in July 2012. The estimated cost of reclaiming oilsands mines is almost $31 billion. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

How engineered bacteria could clean up oilsands pollution and mining waste

Solutions to some of the globe’s most daunting environmental challenges may be closer than you think. Scientists are harnessing nature to clean up toxic chemicals and mining waste.
Oilsands tailings are a mixture of water, suspended sand, clay and residual bitumen. (Dan Prat/Canva)

How plants can help clean up oilsands tailing ponds

A new nature-based approach to managing oilsands tailings shows promise in the lab and may soon be tested in the field.
Joe Biden speaks about climate change and wildfires affecting western states on Sept. 14, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

What Joe Biden’s climate plan means for Canada

Biden’s strong climate change position doesn’t appear to have hurt him in the key swing state of Pennsylvania or in the general election more broadly. Here’s what it means for Canada.
Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole holds his first news conference as leader on Parliament Hill in Ottawa in August 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

The risk of ‘peak oil demand’ for Canada’s Conservatives

Recent industry reports indicate that we may be approaching peak global demand for oil. If that’s the case, the federal Conservatives may need to rethink their electoral strategy.
Scarecrows float in an oilsands tailings pond to keep birds from landing, in Fort McMurray, Alta., in June 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

New technology makes wastewater from the oilsands industry safer for fish

New regulations will allow oilsands companies to release 1.3 trillion litres of liquid waste into the Athabasca River in 2022. A new technology could clean the wastewater before it’s let go.
Oil from a ruptured pipeline is vacuumed from a creek near the near the Kalamazoo River in Michigan, July 2010. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Why scientists intentionally spilled oil into a Canadian lake

No one wants an oil spill in their backyard. Yet to understand the real-world fate and effects of diluted bitumen — a Canadian oil sands product — that’s exactly what some scientists did.
COVID-19 is resulting in dramatically decreased demand for gasoline and jet fuel, but it’s just the latest in a string of bad news for oil producers. (Shutterstock)

The coronavirus is just the latest blow to oil producers

COVID-19 is a huge challenge for the whole world, and Canadian oil producers, already suffering from long-term market trends, will be particularly badly hit.
Pipeline pipes are seen at a Trans Mountain facility near Hope, B.C., on Aug. 22, 2019. Project Reconciliation is an Indigenous-led initiative that seeks to buy a stake in the pipeline. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Indigenous ownership of the Trans Mountain pipeline would safeguard the environment

Project Reconciliation is a direct response to one of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s calls that Indigenous communities ‘gain long-term sustainable benefits from economic development projects.’
Gas prices usually rise heading into long weekends. The reasons behind wild oil price fluctuations, reflected at the pumps, is about a lot more than economics. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Understanding the rollercoaster ride of oil prices

Oil prices have little to do with supply or demand or even economic forces. Instead, it’s all about politics.
Protesters demonstrate against the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in May 2018 in Vancouver. Building infrastructure is a tricky business for the private and public sector alike. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

The risky business of government-run pipelines

When the Canadian government announced its pending ownership in the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, it entered the complex business of pipeline infrastructure.
Plans for a new bridge between Detroit and Windsor, Ont., named after hockey great Gordie Howe, will increase the flow of goods between Canada and the U.S. But Canada’s current trade war with the United States means the country should diversify its economy by relying less on its southern neighbour. HE CANADIAN PRESS/Dave Chidley

Beyond NAFTA: Canada must find new global markets

Is Canada ready for a scenario where the North American Free Trade Agreement is scrapped? The tense negotiations with the United States are a chance for Canada to diversify its trade partnerships.
Demonstrators protest the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion – and compare Justin Trudeau to Donald Trump – at a gathering in Vancouver on May 29, 2018. The controversy over the pipeline requires a national compromise. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canadians deserve a real pipeline compromise

The Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion is fast becoming one of the most divisive issues in Canadian politics in years. Here’s how a compromise can be reached.
People listen during a protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion on May 29, 2018. The federal government’s decision to buy the project doesn’t inspire confidence for potential investors eyeing Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

What the Kinder Morgan decision says about investing in Canada

The decision of the Canadian government to purchase the $4.5 billion Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project doesn’t exactly instil confidence in Canada’s investment climate.

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