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Canada’s Indigenous leaders are concerned that the federal government’s promised support to help First Nations, Inuit and Métis people deal with the impacts of COVID-19 may not be sufficient. Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde, second from right, makes the point during a news conference in Ottawa with First Nations leaders. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Indigenous communities at increased risk during the coronavirus pandemic

Measures to control the spread of COVID-19 within Indigenous communities represent less than one per cent of Canada's funding to limit the impacts of the virus.
A patient is connected to an oxygen tank at the Afghan-Japan Communicable Disease Hospital for COVID-19 patients in Kabul, Afghanistan, in June 2020. Afghan media has reported that COVID-19 patients are dying in government hospitals due to shortages of medical oxygen. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Afghanistan’s COVID-19 crisis has been fuelled by armed conflict

Decades of armed conflict in Afghanistan has destroyed health-care infrastructure and the reconstruction efforts have failed to provide accessible healthcare, exacerbating the COVID-19 crisis.
Demands on nurses for such things as electronic record keeping take time away from patients. They can also lead to resource deprivation trauma. Helen King/The Image Bank/Getty Images

The psychological trauma of nurses started long before coronavirus

COVID-19 is traumatizing nurses. Yet nurses have suffered trauma for decades, often due to insufficient resources, and changes within the field have been slow.
During the pandemic, hospital areas designated for COVID-19 patients are called ‘hot zones.’ (Hannah Kirkham)

Hot and cold zones: Life and death in a Montréal COVID-19 hospital

The only chaplain in the COVID-19 section of a Montréal hospital offers spiritual care to patients and families, as well to staff, who have found themselves more intimately exposed to life and death.
At least 21 states have taken actions within the last four months to limit the liability of health care providers related to the coronavirus. David Ramos/Getty Images

States are making it harder to sue nursing homes over COVID-19: Why immunity from lawsuits is a problem

Nearly half the states have reduced liability for health care providers at a time when nursing home regulation is declining and families can't visit loved ones for fear of spreading the coronavirus.
Pairing widespread testing with fast, effective contact tracing is considered essential for controlling the coronavirus’s spread as the U.S. passes 100,000 deaths. AP Images/Rick Bowmer

How coronavirus contact tracing works in a state Dr. Fauci praised as a model to follow

Since the state's first coronavirus case surfaced, trained case investigators have traced the contacts of every person who tested positive. Here's what else South Carolina got right.
Emergency rooms across the country have seen sharp drops in the number of patients seeking care for problems other than COVID-19. AAron Ontiveroz/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

‘I thought I could wait this out’: Fearing coronavirus, patients delayed hospital visits, putting health and lives at risk

Delaying medical care comes at a cost, both human and financial. The patients some emergency rooms have been seeing are a lot sicker and more likely to need hospitalization.

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