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Texas A&M University

Texas A&M is the state’s oldest public university and largest university, and one of the largest in the nation: a research-intensive, land-grant institution with more than 69,300 students, including nearly 15,000 in graduate or professional school. Students choose from more than 130 undergraduate and 272 graduate degree programs in 16 colleges and schools, and participate in more than 1,100 student-run organizations and activities (including the Big Event, the largest one-day, student-run service project in the United States).

Texas A&M ranks in the top 20 nationally in research expenditures, with more than $922 million in FY2018 (National Science Foundation), and is a member of the Association of American Universities. Texas A&M ranks at or near the top among universities nationally in the areas of academic excellence, value, and affordability; on-time student graduation rates (both overall and for minorities); student engagement and happiness; and students who graduate with less college-related debt and become the nation’s highest-earning graduates. Texas A&M also has more graduates serving as CEOs of Fortune 500 companies than any other university.

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A pregnant woman walks past a street mural in Hong Kong on March 23, 2020. With the coronavirus pandemic moving quickly, pregnant women are facing a changing health care system. Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

Pregnant in a time of coronavirus – the changing risks and what you need to know

As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads, pregnant women are facing new health risks and a health care system that's changing around them by the day.
Voyager est risqué pendant l'épidémie de coronavirus. Les aéroports, les arrêts de bus et les stations-service sont particulièrement dangereux. AP Photo/Joeal Calupitan

Coronavirus : du danger de voyager en pleine épidémie

À travers le monde, des millions de personnes cherchent à regagner leur pays, ou à fuir dans des zones jugées moins risquées. Mais tous doivent évaluer les risques éthiques liés au voyage.
Traveling is risky during the coronavirus outbreak. Places like airports, bus stops, and gas stations especially so. AP Photo/Joeal Calupitan

Fleeing from the coronavirus is dangerous for you, the people you encounter along the way and wherever you end up

Universities and colleges around the world are closing. People are fleeing from cities. Some people are being forced to move but others must weigh the risks and ethical concerns of travel.
A police officer in Beijing adjusts his face mask, which millions in China are using in hopes of preventing coronavirus infection, on Feb. 9, 2020. The virus is causing major disruptions. AP Photo/Andy Wong

The silent threat of the coronavirus: America’s dependence on Chinese pharmaceuticals

While US residents may feel safe from the effects of the coronavirus, the aftershocks could be damaging in unexpected ways. The disruption to China's supply chain could cause drug shortages.
A welcome sign to Bristol, a small town that sits in Virginia and Tennessee, June 26, 2019. Bristol is trying to recruit doctors because the rural town is facing many of the same health care shortages of other rural towns. Sudhin Thanawala/AP Photo

Rural hospital closings reach crisis stage, leaving millions without nearby health care

Rural hospital closings have accelerated in recent years, leaving not only sick people but ghost towns in their wake. Does the failure to fix it speak to the ills of the larger health care system?
Some people believe that putting collagen in your coffee will bring good health, but collagen in coffee does nothing good for you. Imagepocket/Shutterstock.com

Collagen in your coffee? A scientist says forget it

A protein called collagen keeps us connected by keeping our tissues together. In recent years, it's gained popularity for restoring aging skin, with some people even saying you should drink it.

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