University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is a public, coeducational research university in Eugene, Oregon, United States. UO was founded in 1876 and graduated its first class two years later.

The Carnegie Foundation classifies the University of Oregon as a Tier 1 RU/VH (very high research activity) university. It is one of 108 universities to have such a designation. Additionally, the UO is one of only two Association of American Universities members in the Pacific Northwest.

As a flagship university of the Oregon University System, the UO is one of the nation’s many public teaching and research universities. As of Fall 2012, UO offers 269 degree programs, including highly nationally-ranked graduate programs in Biology, Business, Education, Environmental Law, Geological Sciences, Physics, Psychology, Sports Marketing, and Sustainable Design.

As of March 2012, University of Oregon faculty and alumni include two Nobel Prize recipients, 10 Pulitzer Prize winners, 19 Rhodes scholars, four Marshall scholars, 58 Guggenheim Fellows, and 129 Fulbright scholars.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 183 articles

The bodies of Salvadoran migrant Oscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez and his daughter lie on the bank of the Rio Grande in Matamoros, Mexico. AP Photo/Julia Le Duc

How much power can one image actually have?

A photo of a drowned father and his 23-month-old daughter at the US-Mexico border has prompted horror and outrage on social media. Can it spur aid for migrants?
Archaeological visualization of Angkor Wat at sunset, with site map at upper right. Tom Chandler, Mike Yeates, Chandara Ung and Brent McKee, Monash University, SensiLab, 2019

Angkor Wat archaeological digs yield new clues to its civilization’s decline

Many tourists hold an outdated romanticized image of an abandoned temple emerging from the jungle. But research around Angkor Wat suggests its collapse might be better described as a transformation.
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange leaves Southwark Crown Court in London, May 1, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

Assange’s new indictment: Espionage and the First Amendment

Julian Assange's indictment under the Espionage Act, a sweeping law with heavy penalties for unauthorized receiving or disclosing of classified information, poses a threat to press freedom.
Thurgood Marshall outside the Supreme Court in Washington in 1958. Marshall, the head of the NAACP’s legal arm who argued part of the case, went on to become the Supreme Court’s first African-American justice. AP

The Brown v. Board of Education case didn’t start how you think it did

While the Brown vs. Board of Education case is often celebrated for ordering school desegregation, history shows many black people in the city where the case began opposed integrated schools.
Seattle Times publisher Frank Blethen testifies in February at a public hearing at the Washington legislature against limiting legislative branch disclosure. AP/Ted S. Warren

Secrecy versus sunshine: Efforts to hide government records never stop

Government produces millions of pages of records every day: studies, reports, memos, emails, budgets and more. These reports belong to the public, but increasingly, lawmakers are trying to hide them.
Julian Assange goes back to court in London on May 2. Reuters/Hannah Mckay

Is the Assange indictment a threat to the First Amendment?

The US indicted WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange for conspiring to hack into a government computer. But the prosecution of Assange may also pose a risk to the rights of journalists in the US.
A U.S. Forest Service employee using a drop torch during a planned burn in Arizona’s Coconino National Forest. USFS/Ian Horvath

Planned burns can reduce wildfire risks, but expanding use of ‘good fire’ isn’t easy

Decades of wildfire suppression have allowed flammable fuels to pile up in US forests. Scientists and managers say careful use of planned fires can reduce risks of large, out-of-control burns.
Anne McClain of NASA runs through procedures in the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft during a vehicle fit check Nov. 20. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

Female astronauts: How performance products like space suits and bras are designed to pave the way for women’s accomplishments

Designing for women goes beyond just making gear in a size small. By not tailoring equipment and uniforms for women and other underserved people, we prevent them from reaching their full potential.

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