Menu Close

University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is a public, coeducational research university in Eugene, Oregon, United States. UO was founded in 1876 and graduated its first class two years later.

The Carnegie Foundation classifies the University of Oregon as a Tier 1 RU/VH (very high research activity) university. It is one of 108 universities to have such a designation. Additionally, the UO is one of only two Association of American Universities members in the Pacific Northwest.

As a flagship university of the Oregon University System, the UO is one of the nation’s many public teaching and research universities. As of Fall 2012, UO offers 269 degree programs, including highly nationally-ranked graduate programs in Biology, Business, Education, Environmental Law, Geological Sciences, Physics, Psychology, Sports Marketing, and Sustainable Design.

As of March 2012, University of Oregon faculty and alumni include two Nobel Prize recipients, 10 Pulitzer Prize winners, 19 Rhodes scholars, four Marshall scholars, 58 Guggenheim Fellows, and 129 Fulbright scholars.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 259 articles

A visualization of daily life around Angkor Wat in the late 12th century. Tom Chandler, Mike Yeates, Chandara Ung and Brent McKee, Monash University, 2021

A metropolis arose in medieval Cambodia – new research shows how many people lived in the Angkor Empire over time

Combining archaeological evidence, aerial scans and machine learning algorithms, researchers modeled how this medieval city grew over time.
A rally at the Alabama Statehouse on March 30, 2021, to draw attention to and protest anti-transgender legislation introduced in Alabama. Julie Bennett/Getty Images

Anti-transgender bills are latest version of conservatives’ longtime strategy to rally their base

A civil rights scholar looks at the large number of anti-transgender policies being debated and passed in state capitols. They are a staple issue for conservatives who want to rally their base.
The dining-out experience has changed as people wear masks and are separated by plexiglass in outdoor dining. Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

From haute cuisine to hot dogs: How dining out has evolved over 200 years – and is innovating further in the pandemic

The pandemic changed people's dining-out experience, with takeout becoming more common. But since dining out became fashionable in the 18th century, how and where people go to eat has been evolving.
The colors in this microscope photo of a fruit fly brain show different types of neurons and the cells that surround them in the brain. Sarah DeGenova Ackerman

Astrocyte cells in the fruit fly brain are an on-off switch that controls when neurons can change and grow

Adaptable neurons are tied to learning and memory but also to neurological disorders. By studying fruit flies, researchers found a mechanism that controls neuroplasticity.
President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden at the first debate of the presidential campaign. AP/Julio Cortez and AP/Patrick Semansky

Trump and Biden clash in chaotic debate – experts react on the court, race and election integrity

They shouted, they interrupted, they insulted – and not entirely in equal measure. But Biden and Trump also touched on the issues occasionally. Our panel of experts analyzed three key exchanges.
What route did the first settlers to colonize the islands of the Caribbean take? M.M. Swee/Moment via Getty Images

Archaeologists determined the step-by-step path taken by the first people to settle the Caribbean islands

Did people settle these islands by traveling north from South America, or in the other direction? Reanalyzing data from artifacts discovered decades ago provides a definitive answer.
Permitir que se infectan deliberadamente a humanos con COVID-19 podría acelerar el proceso de los ensayos clínicos. AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

El dilema ético de permitir los ensayos médicos en los que se infectan deliberadamente a humanos con COVID-19

Los ensayos de exposición en humanos conllevan riesgos importantes para los voluntarios, pero también podrían generar importantes beneficios para la humanidad: una vacuna para el coronavirus.
A family poses after the Not One Less protest in Missori Square in Milan on June 26. Family and friends are important allies against domestic violence. Valeria Ferraro/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Family and friends can be key to helping end domestic violence, study suggests

Domestic violence is always a problem, but especially during the pandemic. A recent study found that friends and family can help, but they, too, need support.

Authors

More Authors