University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is a public, coeducational research university in Eugene, Oregon, United States. UO was founded in 1876 and graduated its first class two years later.

The Carnegie Foundation classifies the University of Oregon as a Tier 1 RU/VH (very high research activity) university. It is one of 108 universities to have such a designation. Additionally, the UO is one of only two Association of American Universities members in the Pacific Northwest.

As a flagship university of the Oregon University System, the UO is one of the nation’s many public teaching and research universities. As of Fall 2012, UO offers 269 degree programs, including highly nationally-ranked graduate programs in Biology, Business, Education, Environmental Law, Geological Sciences, Physics, Psychology, Sports Marketing, and Sustainable Design.

As of March 2012, University of Oregon faculty and alumni include two Nobel Prize recipients, 10 Pulitzer Prize winners, 19 Rhodes scholars, four Marshall scholars, 58 Guggenheim Fellows, and 129 Fulbright scholars.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 151 articles

Catnip induces changes in cat behavior. Anna Hoychuk

Is it unethical to give your cat catnip?

Catnip can induce changes in cat behavior. An expert argues that giving it to cats raises questions about human power and animal autonomy.
A worker answers a telephone in the office of pro-Brexit group Leave.EU in London, February 2016. REUTERS/Neil Hall

Brexit rooted more in elite politics than mass resentment

The history of Britain's vote to exit from the European Union, known as Brexit, is not a tale of populist resentment toward globalization. It is a top-down story of leaders and elite ideology.
View of Taichung City, Taiwan, behind a mosquito net. Alan Picard / Shutterstock.com

Opening up research labs with modified mosquitoes to the community

Genetically modified mosquitoes breed fear and suspicion, especially since the research happens behind closed doors, away from the public. Now scientists and architects are trying to change that model.
Texas Tribune reporter Jay Root interviews New Mexico State Land Commissioner Aubrey Dunn along Highway 652 near the Texas-New Mexico border. Marjorie Kamys Cotera for The Texas Tribune/Courtesy of NewsMatch

How local journalism can upend the ‘fake news’ narrative

A recent survey found that Americans trust local media outlets far more than national ones.
Volunteering at a food bank is one way people feel rewarded by giving. AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar

When you’re grateful, your brain becomes more charitable

How does being thankful about things in your own life relate to any selfless concern you may have about the well-being of others? A neuroscientist explores the gratitude/altruism connection.
Supreme Court justices stood with Brett Kavanaugh, his wife Ashley, President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump on the day of Kavanaugh’s investiture. AP/Supreme Court provided

Kavanaugh’s impact on the Supreme Court and the country may not be as profound as predicted

With Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court, many predict that the court will move to the right on issues from abortion to gun rights. But Supreme Court rulings are often not the last word on a matter.
President Donald Trump and other federal and state officials tour a mobile home and RV park on Nov. 17, 2018 in the wake of the Camp Fire. Paul Kitagaki Jr./The Sacramento Bee via AP, Pool

Better forest management won’t end wildfires, but it can reduce the risks – here’s how

Forest management is not a cure-all for wildfires, although it can help reduce the chances of massive burns. Making this happen will require broad collaborative efforts and more money.
The lies most people tell on dating apps do serve a purpose. Dado Photos

The lies we tell on dating apps to find love

Researchers analyzed troves of messages sent between matches and found that the fibs people tell are usually rational ones that serve a purpose.

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