University of Wollongong

The University of Wollongong has become a benchmark for Australia’s new generation of universities. It is ranked among the best 20 modern universities in the world* and has built a reputation as an enterprising institution, with a multi-disciplinary approach to research and a personalised approach to teaching. Over 32,000 students are studying UOW degrees across nine campuses throughout Australia and internationally in Dubai and Hong Kong.

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Displaying 61 - 80 of 497 articles

Victoria has led the way in upgrading intercity rail services with medium-speed VLocity trains that have a cruising speed of 160km/h. Joe Castro/AAP

Let’s get moving with the affordable medium-speed alternatives to the old dream of high-speed rail

High-speed rail for Australia has been on the drawing boards since the mid-1980s but has come to nothing. Three states are developing medium-speed rail with federal funding, but NSW is missing out.
John Howard, pictured here with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, is fond of describing the Liberal Party as a “broad church”. But that breadth has led to increasing fracture within the party in recent years. AAP/Dean Lewins

Can the Liberal Party hold its ‘broad church’ of liberals and conservatives together?

The battle between liberals and conservatives continues to split the Liberal Party, but its past heroes would find the ideological division puzzling.
Picture painted by a primary school child in Sri Lanka after the tsunami in 2005. UNESCO World Heritage Centre

Children aren’t liabilities in disasters – they can help, if we let them

It's understandable to want to shield children from the impacts of disasters. But research suggests that they should be given a voice in disaster planning and a role in reducing the risks.
The Department of Human Services approach to social security fraud prosecutions has become less punitive in recent years. Julian Smith/AAP

Why prosecutions for welfare fraud have declined in Australia

Despite a public focus on punitive approaches to welfare fraud, the number of social security fraud prosecutions has fallen in recent years.
When we get hot, sensors in the body tell the brain. The brain then tells the sweat glands to work, and we sweat. Marcella Cheng/NY-CC-BD

Curious Kids: What happens in the body when we sweat?

Sweat comes from special parts in our skin called glands. You might be able to see them if you have a very strong magnifying glass.
In July 2017, new research was published that pushed the opening chapters of Australian history back to 65,000 years ago. Marcella Cheng/The Conversation

Essays On Air: When did Australia’s human history begin?

When did Australia’s human history begin? The Conversation, CC BY16.6 MB (download)
Today's episode of Essays On Air, the audio version of our Friday essay series, seeks to move beyond the view of ancient Australia as a timeless and traditional foundation story.
Since sodium is abundant, battery technology that uses it side-steps many of the issues associated with lithium batteries. Paul Jones/UOW

Charging ahead: how Australia is innovating in battery technology

Demand for energy storage is increasing – both in Australia and around the world. But issues with the production of lithium-ion batteries mean the search is on for alternatives.
There are concerns that the new draft poultry standards don’t truly have chickens’ welfare at heart. Ben Romalis/Shutterstock.com

Governments can’t be trusted to deliver welfare standards for chickens

The current review of standards for egg and poultry farming does little to assuage fears that the industry wields too much influence. Only an independent regulator can restore public confidence.

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