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Articles on Brain development

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Recent advances in research on human development, and brain science in particular, have revealed that traumatic childhood literally changes the human body, affecting brain development. (Shutterstock)

There is an urgent need to prevent the lifelong damage caused by adverse childhood experiences

The impact of early childhood trauma on lifelong physical and mental health makes it urgent to invest in programs to support healthy pregnancies and stable, caring very early childhoods.
The U.S. BRAIN Initiative seeks to elucidate the connection between brain structure and function. Science Photo Library - PASIEKA/Brand X Pictures via Getty Images

Illuminating the brain one neuron and synapse at a time – 5 essential reads about how researchers are using new tools to map its structure and function

From figuring out where memories are stored to how sensory information translates to behavior, new technologies are helping neuroscientists better understand how the brain works.
A diet high in sugary foods can affect brain development in children. carlosgaw/iStock via Getty Images Plus

How does excess sugar affect the developing brain throughout childhood and adolescence? A neuroscientist who studies nutrition explains

Kids often crave processed sugary foods. But research shows that consuming too many treats during childhood and adolescence may lead to behavioral and emotional problems.
Brain folding typically begins at the end of the. second trimester of pregnancy and continues after birth. Hiroshi Watanabe/DigitalVision via Getty Images

Brain wrinkles and folds matter – researchers are studying the mechanics of how they form

Understanding how brain folding works could help researchers better diagnose and treat neurodevelopmental disorders.
The original Dikika child skull (left), a 3D model produced with synchrotron scanning (middle), and a model corrected for distortion during fossilisation (right). Gunz et al. (2020) / Science Advances.

Baby steps: this ancient skull is helping us trace the path that led to modern childhood

Our findings reveal the slowing down of brain development in our ape-like ancestors began more than three million years ago.
Just a few millimeters across, organoids are clumps of cells that resemble the brain. Madeline Andrews, Arnold Kriegstein's lab, UCSF

Brain organoids help neuroscientists understand brain development, but aren’t perfect matches for real brains

Brain organoids are tiny models that neuroscientists use to learn more about how the brain grows and works. But new research finds important differences between the model and the real thing.

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