Articles on Brain development

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The living coelacanth in its natural environment off the South African coast. Laurent Ballesta, Gombessa expeditions, Andromede Oceanology Ltd (from the book Gombessa, meeting with the coelacanth)

We scanned one of our closest cousins, the coelacanth, to learn how its brain grows

The discovery of a living coelacanth fish rocked the world in 1939, as scientists thought they had died out with the dinosaurs. A new study illuminates how its skull and tiny brain develop.
Harnessing adolescents’ readiness to help can be good for them and their communities. YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV/Shutterstock.com

Adolescents have a fundamental need to contribute

Teens get a bad rap as selfish, dangerous risk-takers. But neuroscience and psychology research is revising that image: Adolescents are primed to help those around them, with positive benefits for all.
Researchers have grown groups of brain cells in the lab – known as ‘organoids’ – that produce brain waves resembling those found in premature infants. from www.shutterstock.com

Fresh urgency in mapping out ethics of brain organoid research

Science is creating new living matter – like stem cells grown to create brain tissues in the lab. With power comes responsibility and what matters is an ethical question, not a scientific one.
The Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committee (JOHSC) of Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia unanimously voted on March 5, 2018 to ban all smoking of marijuana products on campus — for health and safety reasons. (Flickr/Chuck Grimmett)

Marijuana-friendly campuses? I don’t think so …

In advance of marijuana legalization in Canada, one university in British Columbia has taken a firm stance, banning all smoking of cannabis products on campus.
Violence in communities may have an additional unseen victim: young peoples’ developing brains. Zoran Karapancev/Shutterstock.com

Living with neighborhood violence may shape teens’ brains

Experiencing and witnessing violence in their communities can lead to emotional, social and cognitive problems for kids. A new study shows it affects how their developing brains grow, as well.
A lone new neuron (green) in a 13-year-old’s hippocampus. Sorrells et al

Adult human brains don’t grow new neurons in hippocampus, contrary to prevailing view

The scientists behind a controversial new study were surprised by their own results. But they carefully did all they could to 'prove a negative,' and their neurogenesis study is shaking up the field.
A teen looking out of a window. Research shows that traumatic events in childhood can affect children as they mature and limit their education, which in turn can harm their health. Jan Andersen/Shutterstock.com

How childhood experiences contribute to the education-health link

Adverse childhood events can not only cause lasting psychological effects but also learning problems. That, in turn, worsens health outcomes, as literacy is an integral part of health care.
A 2015 study from the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse describes youth perceiving marijuana as “relatively harmless” and “not as dangerous as drinking and driving.” (Unsplash/Conor Limkbocker)

Marijuana at school: Loss of concentration, risk of psychosis

Provincial policies to implement the legal consumption of marijuana are unlikely to protect children and youth. High school teachers and parents will be on the front line.
Southpaws seem to be more common among cats and dogs than humans. Eric Isselee/Shutterstock.com

I’ve always wondered: can animals be left- and right-pawed?

The animal kingdom is full of lefties and righties, although rarely is the ratio skewed as much as it is in humans. If you're wondering about your own pet, you can find out with a simple experiment.

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