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Articles on Indigenous knowledge

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Non-Indigenous researchers need to stop conducting research ‘on’ First Nations communities, and instead work ‘with’ them to gain knowledges. Gundjeihmi Aboriginal Corporation, Vincent Lambert/AAP

‘You can’t just show up and start asking questions’: why researchers need to understand the importance of yarning for First Nations

First Nations communities have experienced data being collected by researchers unethically. Better practices and relationships with communities can happen through ways of sharing such as yarning.
Changes to search terms, through guidance from Indigenous communities and library experts, can align systems with everyday language, but can’t invalidate the terms people use to refer to themselves. (Shutterstock)

Libraries in the U.S. and Canada are changing how they refer to Indigenous Peoples

Beyond revamping misleading terminology, some library science scholars and Indigenous knowledge holders are looking at how to index library materials in ways that reflect Indigenous knowledge.
Dancers performing evening ceremonial Bungul at the Garma Festival in northeast Arnhem Land. Aaron Bunch/AAP Image

Establishing a Voice to Parliament could be an opportunity for Indigenous Nation Building. Here’s what that means

Australian Governments must embrace Indigenous Nation Building if the Uluru Statement is to lead to effective structural reform and self-determined government for First Nations peoples.
Cultural burning practices can clear out flammable plant materials that lead to bushfires. AAP Image/Supplied by DFES, Evan Collis

Recognising Indigenous knowledges is not just culturally sound, it’s good science

This NAIDOC Week, with the effects of climate change affecting Australia, It’s beyond time to listen to First Nations people who have extensive knowledge of caring for Country.
Men participate in a demonstration of rope making for dog teams, May 12, 2022, in Inukjuak, Que. The Canadian Press/Adrian Wyld

Building bridges between scientific and Indigenous knowledge

The DIALOG network forms a bridge between scientific and Indigenous knowledge. It renews the relationship between the university and the Indigenous world, which has for too long been one-sided.
Yao honey-hunters harvesting a honeybee nest in Niassa Special. Reserve, Mozambique, where human-honeyguide cooperation still thrives. Photo by Jessica van der Wal

Why it’s crucial to safeguard the ancient practice of finding wild honey with birds

Cooperating with honeyguides has been found to increase food security. It facilitates cultural traditions and enables income or trade.
Drought in Navajo Nation. Indigenous people around the world are dealing with many environmental problems, such as access to water. Spencer Platt/Getty Images News

Why Indigenous communities need a seat at the table on climate

An Anglican Aboriginal pastor who attended the COP26 climate conference shares his perspective on Indigenous knowledge in dealing with climate change.
The old village of Aceredo, submerged 30 years ago when a hydropower dam flooded the valley, emerged during a drought in northwestern Spain, in February 2022. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

IPCC report: Half the world is facing water scarcity, floods and dirty water — large investments are needed for effective solutions

Water is central to adapting to climate change, but very few of the strategies put in place to respond to water hazards or ensure its availability have been evaluated.

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