Articles on Indigenous knowledge

Displaying 1 - 20 of 36 articles

Environmentalists and activists with posters “peace in the forest and an end to indigenous genocide” in protest of the rights of indigenous people, in São Paulo, Brazil, January, 2019. PARALAXIS /Shutterstock

Defending the environment now more lethal than soldiering in some war zones – and indigenous peoples are suffering most

Indigenous peoples safeguard biodiversity better than any other group. But in 2018, 164 were killed defending the environment. It's time for us to heed their knowledge, and protect their future.
Mukurtu is a Warumungu word meaning “dilly bag” or a safe keeping place for sacred materials. Nina Maile Gordon/The Conversation CC-NY-BD

Mukurtu: an online dilly bag for keeping Indigenous digital archives safe

Mukurtu: an online dilly bag for keeping Indigenous digital archives safe. The Conversation71.5 MB (download)
Mukurtu - Warumungu word meaning 'dilly bag' or a safe keeping place for sacred materials - is an online system helping Indigenous people conserve photos, songs and other digital archives.
Addressing Canada’s health inequities through the health-care system will only take us so far. Real change will require listening to Indigenous stories, which teach about our relationships to one another as human beings, and between us and our four-legged, winged, finned, rooted and non-rooted relations. (Unsplash/jongsun lee)

Indigenous knowledge is the solution to Canada’s health inequities

To improve Indigenous health in Canada we need more Indigenous health professionals and more culturally competent health-care providers. We also need to listen properly to Indigenous stories.
Park guards view maps and photos of high-altitude glaciers – information that can be shared with local communities dealing with changing water levels. Anne Toomey

Redefining ‘impact’ so research can help real people right away, even before becoming a journal article

Science can't just stay in the ivory tower. But what does impact really mean and how does it happen? A study of more than a decade of ecological fieldwork projects in Bolivia suggests a better way.
A team of researchers in northern Australia have documented kites and falcons, “firehawks,” intentionally carrying burning sticks to spread fire: It is just one example of western science catching up to Indigenous Traditional Knowledge. James Padolsey/Unsplash

It’s taken thousands of years, but Western science is finally catching up to Traditional Knowledge

A double standard exists concerning the acceptance of Traditional Knowledge by practitioners of Western science.
Indigenous knowledge has aided and enhanced modern science and technology for centuries, Natan Obed, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, speaks about climate change at the global COP22 conference in Marrakech, Morocco, in November 2016. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)

How Indigenous knowledge advances modern science and technology

Traditional Indigenous knowledge and science has aided the development of modern scientific knowledge, and including Indigenous people in science is essential to its future.
Bangladesh is located in a river delta, making it both fertile and extremely vulnerable to disasters. In 2007, cyclone Sidr destroyed parts of this low-lying Bangladeshi island. UNU-EHS/Sonja Ayeb-Karlsson

Facing disasters: lessons from a Bangladeshi island

Why don't people evacuate their homes when warned of impending storm danger? To save lives, resiliency plans must understand how locals in climate-vulnerable places assess risk.
The demand for “decolonised education” may jeopardise research and learning in South Africa. Nic Bothma/EPA

What “decolonised education” should and shouldn’t mean

It's important that South African teachers, lecturers and professors develop curricula that build on the best knowledge skills, values, beliefs and habits from around the world.

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