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Articles on Student mental health

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Focusing on online learning as the problem means lost opportunities to identify solutions and supports for student well-being, which could then be designed into online, in-person or mixed forms of learning. (Allison Shelley for EDUimages)

Why it’s wrong to blame online learning for causing mental health issues during COVID-19

Making unsubstantiated claims that pandemic online learning caused mental health problems doesn’t help us address students’ current needs.
If you feel like you are struggling with your mental health, re-connect with a trusted friend, family member or peer. (The Gender Spectrum Collection)

5 ways students can foster positive mental health at university

The transition to a new school year will be an important time for students to focus on strategies for fostering positive mental health and well-being, and recognizing signs that help may be needed.
In this photo from 2016, students pass through a security checkpoint at William Hackett Middle School in Albany, N.Y., with guards, bag inspections and a metal detector. AP Photo/Mike Groll

Does hardening schools make students safer?

Surveillance cameras, metal detectors, door-locking systems and armed guards have not prevented school shootings. A school safety scholar examines other possible approaches.
School counselors like Jacquelyn Indrisano, left, can help students feel welcome and safe at school. Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

School mental health resources critical to ensuring safe school environments

School violence prevention requires professionals – counselors, psychologists and social workers – who know how to create an emotionally safe environment. Those staffers are in very short supply.
The choice about whether or not to disclose a mental health condition to colleagues or managers, or to share a personal mental illness story with students, includes a number of complex factors. (Shutterstock)

Should university instructors disclose mental health conditions? It’s complicated

The pandemic has introduced a new context for university instructors navigating boundaries and responsibilities around their students’ and their own well-being and mental health.
Although some youth are clearly reporting a negative effect on their social, personal and educational lives during the pandemic, the majority are responding to COVID-19 in ways that are developmentally and psychologically normal. (Canva)

Not as good as we want, not as bad as we’ve heard: Teen mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

Is there a mental health crisis among young people, or are worry and sadness to be expected? Pathologizing normal, healthy responses to adverse events promotes misunderstanding about mental illness.
Students headed to university are thirsty for socializing and missed milestones, and risky alcohol consumption could be more of a problem than it usually is. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Universities need to prepare for student binge drinking after COVID-19 shutdowns

Cancelling campus events won’t address the potential harms of binge drinking this fall. Universities must plan additional activities to curb risky alcohol use and promote student wellness.
Managing academic expectations, culture shock, language barriers and financial constraints amid concerns about viral safety are some of the intersecting stressors faced by international students. (Shutterstock)

5 ways international students can harness emotional intelligence to deal with COVID-19 stress

International students are a vulnerable population who have faced many stressors in the COVID-19 pandemic. Emotional intelligence can help navigate these.
For generations, queer people have demonstrated their adaptability to navigate life outside the status quo with supportive communities. (Shutterstock)

Pride Month and queer students: Why creatively drawing on virtual community during COVID-19 matters

Queer people have learned to build and rely on “chosen families.” Finding ways to creatively bolster and expand our networks of care takes on renewed importance in the pandemic.
A lone cyclist rides past the University of Toronto campus during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on June 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

For university students, COVID-19 stress creates perfect conditions for mental health crises

University students had high rates of mental health issues before the pandemic. The additional stressors of COVID-19 and social isolation will make them even more vulnerable over the winter.
COVID-19 has not influenced a change in some students’ partying behaviors. Here, two young people talk at a bar in Marseille, France, Sept. 12, 2020. (AP Photo/Daniel Cole)

COVID-19 outbreaks at universities: Students need safe places to socialize, not partying bans

Both university and government policy-makers need to re-tool their messaging to students about off-campus socializing to shape more positive mental health and COVID-19 outcomes.

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