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Articles on Vaccine confidence in Canada

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In the reluctance to vaccinate, there is a lack of trust and understanding of the scientific process. Better communication would help rebuild bridges. The Canadian Press/Paul Chiasson

A researcher’s view on COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: The scientific process needs to be better explained

Before the pandemic, the public perceived science as infallible and inaccessible. But the opening up of research to the general public has changed that perception.
People getting vaccinated may still have questions about COVID-19 vaccines, like why it takes two doses — and then two weeks — to take full effect. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

I work at a COVID-19 vaccine clinic. Here’s what people ask me when they’re getting their shot — and what I tell them

A medical student answers questions he gets asked at a COVID-19 vaccine clinic: Efficacy versus real-world effectiveness, immune response and how the mRNA vaccines compare to vaccines already in wide use.
FDA approval of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine may boost vaccination rates among those who have been hesitant to get the shot. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine now has full FDA approval. Here’s what that means for unvaccinated people, organizations and pharma

The U.S. FDA has approved the first COVID-19 vaccine. How is approval different from emergency use authorization, and what difference will it make to a vaccine that’s already in global use?
The children’s book, Little Louis, tells the story of a young boy preparing for his COVID-19 vaccination. (Morning Star Lodge)

Indigenous children’s book ‘Little Louis’ aims to curb COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy with a culturally relevant story

There is an urgent need to combat historically fuelled vaccine hesitancy within Indigenous communities. The best way to do this is through evidence-based knowledge and community-led work.
Unmanaged needle fear is very distressing for those affected and can influence health-care choices. Science-backed methods can help people manage their phobia and get vaccinated. (Shutterstock)

Needle fears can cause COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, but these strategies can manage pain and fear

For the one in 10 people with a significant fear of needles, getting a vaccination is distressing. This can disrupt vaccination campaigns, but there are effective ways to manage pain and fear.
Vaccine efficacy statistics are often based on the results of randomized controlled trials. (Art-Aleatoire.com)

How effective are COVID-19 vaccines? Here’s what the stats mean … and what they don’t

Vaccine efficacy is usually expressed as a percentage, but what is it actually measuring? Statisticians explain what the numbers mean, and what they say about how well a vaccine can protect us.
People receive a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine at a mass vaccination clinic at Scotiabank Arena in Toronto in June 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston

Vaccine hesitancy is decreasing in Canada, but it’s too soon to celebrate

Vaccine hesitancy is declining in Canada but hasn’t disappeared. New research shows many of those initially less hesitant have since been convinced. With continued efforts, others can still be reached.
Information on COVID-19 vaccines for pregnant or breastfeeding individuals has been inconsistent and hard to find. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine while pregnant or breastfeeding? Experts explain the safety, evidence and clinical trials

Exclusion from clinical trials, lack of data and inconsistent information made it difficult for pregnant and breastfeeding people to make decisions about COVID-19 vaccines early in the rollout.
Hundreds of residents of Toronto’s M3N postal code, a hotspot for COVID-19 infections, line up at a pop-up vaccine clinic on In April 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston

Even with equal vaccination rates, COVID-19 hotspots still have higher infection rates

Hotspot neighbourhoods with greater COVID-19 risk exposure continued to have higher infection rates even when they achieved vaccination levels equal to lower-risk neighbourhoods.
Researchers say conspiracy theories around COVID-19 are spreading at an alarming rate across the country — and they warn that misinformation shared online may lead to devastating consequences. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Sowing the seeds of science: How thinking of information like a garden can help us address misinformation

Gardening provides a helpful metaphor to help us understand how individual and platform approaches to misinformation need to be accompanied by policy and cultural reforms.
Little work has been done to understand young people’s willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccines. Above: a COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the University of Toronto Mississauga campus on May 6. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin 

How to increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake and decrease vaccine hesitancy in young people

As vaccine eligibility is expanded to adolescents and young adults, understanding who might be more likely to be vaccine hesitant, and why, can help inform public health strategies

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