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Articles on Women's rights

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A protest against bride kidnapping in Kyrgyzstan’s capital, Bishkek, on April 8, 2021, after a young woman abducted for marriage was found dead. Vyacheslav Oseledko/AFP via Getty Images

‘Bride kidnapping’ haunts rural Kyrgyzstan, causing young women to flee their homeland

In rural Kyrgyzstan, 1 in 3 marriages begins with an abduction. Older generations see this as a harmless tradition, but two brides have been killed since 2018. A study finds other problems, too.
In this March 2019 photo, Afghan artists work on a barrier wall of the Ministry of Women’s Affairs marking International Women’s Day, in Kabul, Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Women negotiators in Afghan/Taliban peace talks could spur global change

Without women’s inclusion and meaningful participation, any peace agreement between Afghanistan and the Taliban will lack legitimacy.
Long time there: U.S. troops maneuver around the central part of the Baghran river valley as they search for remnants of Taliban and al-Qaida forces on Feb. 24, 2003. Aaron Favila/Pool/AP Photo

US postpones Afghanistan troop withdrawal in hopes of sustaining peace process: 5 essential reads

The Afghanistan War now has an end date: 9/11/21. Experts explain the history of US involvement in Afghanistan, the peace process to end that conflict and how the country's women are uniquely at risk.
Indian women during a protest against the central government’s recent agricultural reforms, in Gurgaon, February 6, 2021. Sajjad Hussain/AFP

Feminist struggles in times of pandemic: lessons from rural India

While the Covid-19 pandemic has exposed and exacerbated gender inequalities, it has also incited women-led initiatives and mobilisations.
Members of a Salvadoran feminist group watch a virtual hearing March 10 on El Salvador’s abortion laws by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. Marvin Recinos/AFP via Getty Images

El Salvador’s abortion ban jails women for miscarriages and stillbirths – now one woman’s family seeks international justice

Hundreds of Salvadoran women have been prosecuted for homicide for having abortions, miscarriages or stillbirths since 1997. Now an international court must decide: Is that legal?
Planting paddy saplings in Patiala, India. Three-quarters of Indian farmers are women, but most don’t own their land. Bharat Bhushan/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Women grow as much as 80% of India’s food – but its new farm laws overlook their struggles

Most Indian farmers are women. But few own their land, and gender inequality limits their access to markets. These issues won't be fixed by recent agricultural reforms; in fact, they may get worse.
Helping women is an explicit goal of the Biden administration’s pandemic relief plan. Does the gender focus extend to the world? Alex Wong/Getty Images

How a ‘feminist’ foreign policy would change the world

Gender equality doesn't top any country's international agenda – yet. But ever more countries, including the US, are starting to discern that women's rights really are human rights.
Audience members listen to Afghan parliamentarian Fawzia Koofi speak in 2014. Women’s access to politics increased greatly after the Taliban’s 2001 ouster. Sha Marai/AFP via Getty Images

Women in Afghanistan worry peace accord with Taliban extremists could cost them hard-won rights

Afghan women interviewed about current talks between the government and the Taliban say, 'There is no going back.' Taliban fundamentalist rule in the 1990s forced women into poverty and subservience.
Victims of forced sterilizations protest in Lima, Peru, in 2014. Public hearings to uncover this dark chapter of the Fujimori dictatorship began in January. Erneseto Benavides/AFP via Getty Images

Forcibly sterilized during Fujimori dictatorship, thousands of Peruvian women demand justice

Forced sterilization of Indigenous women was a covert part of 'family planning' under Fujimori. Over 200,000 Peruvians underwent tubal ligations between 1996 and 2001 – many without their consent.
Congress had very few women members back in 1960, and just one woman of color: Representative Patsy Mink of Hawaii. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

Patsy Takemoto Mink blazed the trail for Kamala Harris – not famous white woman Susan B. Anthony

Mink, the first woman of color in Congress, brought a racially and historically aware brand of feminism into lawmaking and ran for president in 1972. But women's history largely overlooks her.
Michael Widomski, left, and David Hagedorn at the makeshift memorial for Justice Ginsburg in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Sept. 20, 2020 in Washington, DC. Ginsburg officiated their wedding in 2013. Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Ginsburg’s legal victories for women led to landmark anti-discrimination rulings for the LGBTQ community, too

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death sparked many tributes to her work ending sex discrimination against women. That work also paved the way for successes in the fight for equal rights for the LGBTQ community.

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