Articles on Marine ecosystems

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Tiny Japanese skeleton shrimp Caprella mutica, found in concentrations up to 300,000/m2. SAMS

There are no barriers to prevent marine invasive species

Ash dieback, oak processionary moths, waterway minkes and parrakeets in Kew Gardens – there are plenty of species on and even above ground in the UK that didn’t originate in the country. The fifth Annual…
Fishes’ future rests in our hands. WorldFish

Putting seas up for sale will not save the world’s fish

The oceans cover almost three-quarters of the planet’s surface, and for many people they represent the last great wilderness. But in fact the seas support many human activities, and have done for millennia…
Bright colourful coral like this may soon disappear. USFWS Pacific

Global warming’s evil twin: ocean acidification

Greenhouse gas emissions have warmed the oceans in regions such as the Baltic by as much as 1.3°C. It is now thought that 90% of the heat added to the climate system by humans has been absorbed in the…

Plastics contaminate subalpine lakes

Potentially dangerous plastics and microplastic particles are contaminating subalpine lakes at a rate similar to levels found…

Crustaceans will decline along with reefs

A direct correlation between the amount of pre-historic reefs and the population of decapod crustacean species has been observed…
Best served chilled: Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) Uwe Kils/BAS

A view to a krill: warming seas may leave predators hungry

Although it is far from the power stations, roads and flight paths of the populated world, the Southern Ocean is already responding to climate change. Average sea temperatures in some parts have risen…
This eastern shovelnose stingaree was once unheard of in northern Tasmania. Now it is abundant. Peter Last

Marine life spawns sooner as our oceans warm

Warming oceans are affecting the breeding patterns and habitat of marine life, according to a three-year international study published today in Nature Climate Change. This is effectively re-arranging the…
Australian Museum scientists have discovered an invasive species of worm in Botany Bay - the European Fanworm (Sabella spallanzanii), which is native to the Mediterranean Sea and European Atlantic coast. Stuart Humphreys, Australian Museum

A beautiful pest: invasive marine worm spotted in Sydney

Marine scientists at the Australian Museum have sounded the alarm over an invasive underwater worm discovered in Sydney’s…
Rubbish in the ocean - marine debris - is a terrible threat to wildlife. Discarded fishing nets are among the worst. AAP Image/Department of the Environment and Heritage/Melbourne Zoo

Ghostnets fish on: marine rubbish threatens northern Australian turtles

Each year around 640,000 tonnes of fishing gear is lost or thrown overboard by the fisheries around the world. These “ghostnets” drift through the oceans and can continue fishing for many years. They kill…

Warmer oceans could lead to smaller fish

Change in climate, resulting in warmer and less oxygenated oceans, could mean a reduction in the size of fish. Over 600 species…

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