Articles on Canada

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Carbon taxes on fossil fuels such as gasoline help lower greenhouse gas emissions. (Shutterstock)

Here’s what the carbon tax means for you

Environmental taxes encourage consumers to conserve energy or switch to less carbon-intensive fuels.
Labor wants housing to be a federal election issue, but to solve the problems of recent decades Australian governments need to comprehensively rethink their approach. Julian Smith/AAP

Housing policy reset is overdue, and not only in Australia

The problems with housing systems in Australia and similar countries run deep. Solutions depend on a fundamental rethink of our approach to housing and its central place in our lives and the economy.
A judge’s decision to acquit a Halifax taxi driver charged with sexual assault was protested at this rally in Halifax in March 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

#MeToo: In Canada, rape myths continue to prevent justice for sexual assault survivors

A new Canadian law introduced as a nod to #MeToo, meant to protect sexual assault complainants, will have limited impact because it fails to consider how sexist judges and lawyers interpret laws.
Many cases of lower back pain are best managed through education, exercise and manual treatment. (Shutterstock)

Back pain? A physiotherapist may offer the most effective treatment, if you can afford it

The over-medicalization of back pain is a global concern. New research in Canada shows that people with lower income as well as rural and remote dwellers are less likely to access physiotherapy care.
Tax breaks or exemptions for those working in pharmacy, health insurance and pharmaceutical industries could help bolster support for a national pharmacare plan. (Shutterstock)

Tax breaks could soften the blow of a national pharmacare plan

Two community pharmacists suggest a way for improving the palatability of evidence-based universal pharmacare -- for those working in health insurance, pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry.
In this image taken from video footage run by China’s CCTV, Canadian Robert Lloyd Schellenberg attends his retrial in northeastern China. A Chinese court has sentenced him to death in a sudden retrial in a drug smuggling case that is escalating tensions between the countries over the Canadian arrest of a top Chinese technology executive. (CCTV via AP)

It’s time for Canada and China to tone down the rhetoric

Now is the time to give China the chance to show that while the Chinese justice system can mete out punishment, it can also exercise compassion and could spare the life of a Canadian drug smuggler.
Treaty 4, which covered present-day southern Saskatchewan and a small part of western Manitoba was negotiated and signed at Qu'appelle Lakes. Here Saulteux from Upper Assiniboine River, Oct. 16, 1887 were promised for every ‘man, woman and child $1,200 …blankets and other articles.’ (Library and Archives Canada/Natural Resources Canada fonds/PA-050799).

Historical lawsuit affirms Indigenous laws on par with Canada’s

A recent historical win for Ontario First Nations against the government of Canada is as significant for the legal process, which took into account Anishinaabe law, as it is for the win itself.
Indigenous women’s activism in Canada has a long history. The organizing work of Isabelle McNab, first president of the Saskatchewan Women’s Indian Association, can be seen as the precursor to later activism like this First Nations Idle No More protest for better treatment of Indigenous peoples at the Douglas-Peace Arch near Surrey, B.C., on Jan. 5, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Hidden from history: Indigenous women’s activism in Saskatchewan

Built on historical research, this article tells the resilient, fascinating and rarely told history of Indigenous women's organizing and resistance in Saskatchewan.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks about the federal government’s newly imposed carbon tax at an event in Toronto in October 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Rethinking Canada’s climate policy from the ground up

Canada's top-down approach to designing its climate policy has failed. It needs to find ways to engage with individuals.

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