Articles on India

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Tel Aviv has a reputation as a “non-stop city” but is also known for its local government’s use of smart technology to listen to and respond to residents’ needs and concerns. Alexandra Lande/Shutterstock

How does a city get to be ‘smart’? This is how Tel Aviv did it

To be a smart city is to know what your people want and need. And smart city leaders make sure residents can tell them by using technology to maintain a constant two-way flow of information.
In this 2012 photo, a midwife holds a newborn baby boy she has just delivered by flashlight in Guinea-Bissau. The African country is one of the deadliest places in the world to give birth, with a high rate of maternal death. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

The truth about maternal death

It's not just women in impoverished countries dying in childbirth. The maternal death rate in both Canada and the U.S. has risen, particularly among Indigenous and African-American women.
People queuing to withdraw cash at an ATM. Demonetisation in India has not met its target and actually reinforced informal networks. Santosh Kumar

The shock of Indian demonetisation: a failed attempt to formalise the economy

Instead of a clear movement toward more formalised economic transactions, demonetisation in India has reinforced the informal economy.
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, left, with World Health Organization Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, right, and Nigerian Health Minister Isaac Folorunso Adewole, at the End TB Summit in New Delhi, India, March 13, 2018. (AP Photo)

Hope rises for a world free of TB

On World TB Day 2018, eradicating TB finally looks like a goal that could be met — if political leaders can step up with cash and actions to match their political declarations.
Wild leopards in the Indian city of Mumbai may be helping to save people’s lives. Steve Winter/National Geographic

Leopards in a city park in India may help lower human injuries and deaths from stray dog bites

Wild leopards that live in an Indian city park like to dine on stray dogs, which new research says may help reduce the number of potentially deadly dog bites on people.
A scene from Sir Clarmont Percival Skrine’s film Quetta-Damghan, almost certainly the only colour footage of the Indian Long Range Squadron in action. The film recently has been digitised by the Royal Geographical Society and the British Film Institute. British Film Institute/Royal Geographical Society

British Empire’s hidden workings in India and Iran revealed in remarkable new film footage

More than 100 historic expeditionary and travel films have been digitised recently by the Royal Geographical Society and the British Film Institute.

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