Articles on Linguistics

Displaying 1 - 20 of 111 articles

Indonesia’s language policy makes the use of standard Indonesian a measure of nationalism. Prodita Sabarini/The Conversation Indonesia

Who speaks Indonesian, ‘the envy of multilingual world’?

Indonesian, an engineered language made in the time of colonialism, is "the envy of the multilingual world". But no one speaks standard Indonesian on the streets. Does anyone speak the language?
The influence of countries in francophone Africa, like Ivory Coast, have shifted how universities think about the French language. Reuters/Luc Gnago

The way French is taught in South Africa offers lessons in decolonisation

French is no longer taught as a European language representative of "French" culture in South Africa. New modes of teaching, learning and research speak to an inclusive Africanist agenda.
Everyone sees them all, but we don’t all give them the same distinct names. lazyllama/Shutterstock.com

Languages don’t all have the same number of terms for colors – scientists have a new theory why

People across the globe all see millions of distinct colors. But the terms we use to describe them vary across cultures. New cognitive science research suggests it's about what we want to communicate.
A photo of Stoney Squ-w Mountain in Banff by the Bow River. (Shutterstock)

The S-word: Just stop using it

The word Squ-w has an innocent origin, but its use in English has long been derogatory and racist. Place names which use this word should be changed.
People currently speak 7,000 languages around the globe. Michael Gavin

Why do human beings speak so many languages?

There's little research into origins of the geographic patterns of language diversity. A new model exploring processes that shaped Australia's language diversity provides a template for investigators.
The small city of Hazard, Kentucky, rests in the heart of Appalachia. AP Photo/David Stephenson

Combatting stereotypes about Appalachian dialects

The founder of the West Virginia Dialect Project hopes to debunk some of the myths about the way Appalachian people speak and instill pride in a rich, oft-maligned culture.
It’s really ok to be a grammar pedant. Shutterstock

In defence of grammar pedantry

Grammar pedantry recently contributed to the downfall of World Bank chief economist Paul Romer. But 'grammonds' are people to be celebrated not vilified.

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