Articles on Psychology

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You’re ready to blow your top – but how much is due to your internal hunger and how much to external annoyances? perfectlab/Shutterstock.com

When does hungry become hangry?

Missing a meal can certainly push you toward a bad mood. But new research identifies in what kind of situations hunger is most likely to tip toward hanger.
Roseanne Barr had her sitcom canceled on May 29, after calling former Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett the child of an ape. Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File

The slippery slope of dehumanizing language

Dehumanizing insults have become more common in political discourse. Psychology research has shown that they can prime us for violence – and even change our brains.
This won’t hurt a bit. Gregory Johnston/shutterstock.com

Does pain expected equal pain felt? Ask a kid

Does your child hate their visits to the pediatrician? Do they psyche themselves into a panic that the shot will hurt? The best strategy to calm an anxious child may be to reframe their expectations.
After this episode, you’ll be able to explain how quantum mechanics affects everything from the way your jeans are cut to the headphones you use. Cindy Zhi/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: The explainer episode

The explainer episode. The Conversation, CC BY67.5 MB (download)
Today on Trust me, I'm An Expert, we're explaining the tricky topics: what is quantum mechanics? What does the research say about lone actor terrorism? And why do people like pimple popping videos?
The bravado of bank CEOs in Australia has left a trail of scandals that may take years to fully uncover. Dean Lewins/AAP

Why CEOs need to embrace fear

Positive emotions, such as passion, have an established foothold in airport books on great leadership and executive coaching seminars. However, overemphasising "positive" emotions can be problematic.
A quirky quiz probably isn’t going to tell you much about your innermost essence. StunningArt/Shutterstock.com

Personality tests with deep-sounding questions provide shallow answers about the ‘true’ you

Few can resist an assessment that promises to reveal your hidden, true self. But new research suggests that people mistakenly believe difficult to answer questions offer deep insights.
A man browsing the shoe department in a shopping centre. Can he really afford new shoes, and does he really need them? Alex Buirds/Wikimedia

Why we perceive ourselves as richer than we think we are

Under some circumstances, people may feel wealthier than they actually are and this makes them psychologically more prone to increase their spending, as well as their borrowing.

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