Articles on Métis

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Four hikers walk west, from the village of Val Marie in southern Saskatchewan, along a historical trail once used by Indigenous tribes and settlers. Giving Canadians the ‘right to roam’ might be a small step toward answering the calls of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. James R. Page

Why Canadians need ‘the right to roam’

A right-to-roam movement has never developed in Canada the way it has in the U.K. Here's how it could benefit Canadian society as a whole, including reconciliation efforts with the Indigenous.
Bernie Williams, right, a women’s advocate in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, embraces Carmen Paterson while testifying at the final day of hearings at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, in Richmond, B.C., on April 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Can we really teach ‘Indigenizing’ courses online?

University "Indigenization" efforts using Massive Open Online Courses promise to reach wide audiences. They also raise critical questions about how to embody Indigenous ways of knowing and relating.
Métis Family and a Red River Cart, 1883. (State Historical Society of North Dakota, A4365)

Becoming Indigenous: The rise of Eastern Métis in Canada

New census data sheds light on the country's Indigenous population. In Eastern Canada, the rise in people claiming to be “Métis” is a controversial case of "settler self-indigenization."
The relationship between Canada’s Aboriginal peoples and non-indigenous population has never been an equal one. AAP Image/Adam Gartrell

Canada’s progress shows indigenous reconciliation is a long-term process

The relationship between Canada's Aboriginal peoples and non-indigenous population has never been an equal one, even though the 1982 national constitution recognises Aboriginal rights.

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