Articles on First Nations

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Trail of Tears, a painting of a scene in Golconda, illinois. First Nations were forcefully displaced in huge numbers throughout America. Kevin Schraer

In Trump’s America, immigrants are modern-day ‘savage Indians’

The leader of the United States has made immigrants the new face of a threatening “Other,” a primitive savage who has many of the features of the "Indians" of the American frontier myth.
Designs by Jeneen Frei Njootli on the runway at the Frost Moon Showcase at Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto last weekend. (Red Works Photography)

Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto is healing and resurgence in action

The organizers of Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto gathered a group of designers and creative thinkers to present and discuss the future of Indigenous fashion last week.
A Palestinian boy burns tires during Land Day protests in the West Bank city of Ramallah on March 30, 2018. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

Palestinian Land Day: A universal reminder of what was stolen

Like the colonization of Indigenous lands in North America and the squeezing of Indigenous peoples into "reserves," the colonization and appropriation of Palestinian land is unrelenting.
Bernie Williams, right, a women’s advocate in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, embraces Carmen Paterson while testifying at the final day of hearings at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, in Richmond, B.C., on April 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Can we really teach ‘Indigenizing’ courses online?

University "Indigenization" efforts using Massive Open Online Courses promise to reach wide audiences. They also raise critical questions about how to embody Indigenous ways of knowing and relating.
Tiana Schocko, from Peshawbestown, Mich., and of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa tribe, competes in the youth division of the 22nd Annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest Sunday, Feb. 12, 2012, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Federal budget undermines Indigenous self-determination in sport programs

The federal government's 2018 budget allocates almost $50 million over five years to support sports programs for Indigenous peoples. The problem? The money is going to a non-Indigenous organization.
The Cree community of Peawanuck, located in northern Ontario, is confronting the realities of a changing climate and increasing pressure from mining companies. (John Cutfeet)

Confusion and concern over land-use planning across northern Ontario

Many Indigenous communities across northern Ontario are facing increased pressure to bring their land-use planning and decisions under the jurisdiction of the province
Harley Windsor’s visibility before, during and after these Winter Olympics may just be the catalyst to inspire future generations of Indigenous athletes. AAP/Brendan Esposito

In Harley Windsor, Australia has its first Indigenous Winter Olympian – why has it taken so long?

While Harley Windsor’s selection deserves celebration, it’s surprising that it has taken until now for an Indigenous Australian to compete at a Winter Olympics.
Dr. Cindy Blackstock, executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, has called on the federal government to stop its chronic underfunding of services for Indigenous children. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Canada guilty of forging crisis in Indigenous foster care

No project for reconciliation can succeed unless the federal and provincial governments roll back their power and create space for Indigenous control over their own self-determining futures.
Indigenous knowledge has aided and enhanced modern science and technology for centuries, Natan Obed, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, speaks about climate change at the global COP22 conference in Marrakech, Morocco, in November 2016. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)

How Indigenous knowledge advances modern science and technology

Traditional Indigenous knowledge and science has aided the development of modern scientific knowledge, and including Indigenous people in science is essential to its future.
Demonstrators at a 2010 Toronto rally protesting the mercury contamination of the Wabigoon-English waterway in northwestern Ontario carry long blue banners meant to represent a river. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)

Declaring a water crisis over isn’t the end of the ordeal

The declared end of Flint, Mich., contaminated water crisis echoes similar claims worldwide. Evidence shows victims of past and ongoing water crises, especially Indigenous people, continue to suffer.
New Zealand Labour Party leader Jacinda Ardern, centre, and deputy leader Kelvin Davis, a Maori, far left, answer questions from the media in August in Wellington, New Zealand. Following the Sept. 23 election, Ardern could became the country’s next prime minister if she can convince minor parties to support her. (AP Photo/Nick Perry)

What New Zealand’s vote means for Maori – and potentially First Nations in Canada

While the Maori Party got wiped out in this weekend's New Zealand election, there's still a Maori presence in the country's political system. That's why Canadian First Nations should take note.
Community-led research in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Labrador, helped identify dirty water containers as a source of drinking water contamination.

Collaboration can help in the Indigenous water crisis

Can community-led research help address Canada's Indigenous water security issues? One project from the Inuit community of Rigolet in Labrador suggests it can.
Thousands of copper nails representing thousands of Indigenous children who died in Canada’s residential schools were hammered into the Reconciliation Pole before its raising at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., on April 1, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

This is why most teachers need Indigenous coaches

Many Canadian teachers worry about how to incorporate Indigenous content into the classroom. For one sociology professor, finding Indigenous mentorship was richly rewarding.
Indigenous graduates celebrate at the University of the Fraser Valley, British Columbia. (University of The Fraser Valley/flickr)

Why we need First Nations education authorities

The gap between academic achievement for Indigenous and non-indigenous learners is growing. First Nations education authorities could provide a strategic solution.

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