Articles on US history

Displaying 201 - 220 of 245 articles

Joe Louis and Neil Scott help Isaac Woodard up a set a stairs soon after a beating left him blind. Ossie Leviness/New York Daily News

The police beating that opened America’s eyes to Jim Crow’s brutality

Seventy years ago, a horrific beating left a black World War II vet blind. His determined fight for justice would earn the support of Orson Welles, Woody Guthrie – and even the president.
Protector in chief: Theodore Roosevelt with conservationist John Muir at Yosemite in 1906. U.S. Library of Congress

Who politicized the environment and climate change?

Historically, environmental causes enjoyed bipartisan support but gains by NGOs and the emergence of climate change as a social issue have created a sharp political divide.
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) was often referred to as the Bureau of Livestock and Mining in the 19th century. U.S. Bureau of Land Management

The twisted roots of U.S. land policy in the West

What explains the anger behind the Malheur occupation in Oregon, and why does the BLM own so much land in the West?
Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Raleigh, North Carolina on December 4 2015. Jonathan Drake/Reuters

The rhetorical brilliance of Trump the demagogue

An expert on American political rhetoric breaks down Donald Trump's rhetorical prowess, pointing to the various techniques the candidate has mastered.
Dutch painter Pieter Claesz’s Still Life with Turkey Pie (1627) features a cooked turkey that’s been placed back inside its original skin, feathers and all. Wikimedia Commons

Passeth the cranb'rry sauce! The medieval origins of Thanksgiving

Most of the flavor combinations and traditions we've come to associate with the holiday date back to the Middle Ages.
Members of the Chitimacha language team (from left to right) Sam Boutte, Kim Walden and Rachel Vilcan use the new language software for the first time.

Renaissance on the bayou: the revival of a lost language

In the face of war, disease and outside cultural pressures, the Chitimacha language has survived -- and now thrives.
Blowing up the desert – and people’s minds: the first atom bomb test in 1945. US Government

Radiation in the postwar American mind: from wonder to worry

The first atom bomb test seventy years ago today marks the start of a change in Americans' thinking about radiation. On balance, our nuclear anxieties endure today.
White painter William Gilbert Gaul’s To the End (1907-1909) uses the loyal slave trope. Wikimedia Commons

Exploring how black and white artists depict race

Black Like Us? – a new exhibition at the Birmingham Museum of Art – looks at how blackness has been portrayed in American art through the years.
Arrangement in Grey and Black No.1 (commonly known as Whistler’s Mother), by James McNeill Whistler (1871). Wikimedia Commons

The extraordinary life of Whistler’s mother

The famous portrait, usually resident in France, is on a rare tour in the US. From looking at it, one might assume its subject had a tranquil, even monotonous, life. But one would be wrong.
Hamilton’s political enemies unduly tarnished his legacy. 'Hamilton' via www.shutterstock.com

It’s all about the Hamiltons, baby

Alexander Hamilton's story is our story. It would be a mistake to remove him from the $10 bill.

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