Articles on Wildlife conservation

Displaying 1 - 20 of 301 articles

An Antarctic icebreaker sails past a penguin. But conservationists are still waiting for their own breakthrough. John B. Weller

Why are talks over an East Antarctic marine park still deadlocked?

Australia is among nations calling for a 1 million square km marine park off East Antarctica. But Russia and China remain opposed, and a recent summit yet again failed to seal the deal.
Australia’s species, like this green python, are remarkable, and need far better protection. Jenny Martin

Australia’s species need an independent champion

Australia's species, like this green python, are remarkable and need far better protection.
On the prowl in the outback. Hugh McGregor/Arid Recovery

For whom the bell tolls: cats kill more than a million Australian birds every day

For the first time, researchers have estimated the toll taken by feral and pet cats on Australia's bird life - and the numbers are high enough to push several species towards extinction.
Gene drives aim to deliberately spread bad genes when invasive species such as mice reproduce. Colin Robert Varndell/shutterstock.com

‘Gene drives’ could wipe out whole populations of pests in one fell swoop

Releasing just 100 mice carrying a faulty gene designed to stop them reproducing can remove an entire population of 50,000, a new study shows, paving the way for new eradication efforts.
It can be easier to raise money to aid animals like these African elephants than species that are more threatened with extinction but get humans less excited. www.shutterstock.com

Even ugly animals can win hearts and dollars to save them from extinction

Must the money raised to save wildlife always aid the most popular animals? New research suggests that marketing can persuade donors that northern hairy-nosed wombat lives matter too.
Aggressive behaviour exhibited by socially dominant Tasmanian devils may predispose them to infection with devil facial tumour disease. Sebastien Compte/University of Tasmania

Survival of the fittest? Perhaps not if you’re a Tasmanian devil

It's the Tasmanian devils that enjoy the highest survival and breeding success who're more likely to get the fatal facial tumour disease.

Top contributors

More