Articles sur Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

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From a battle over an oil pipeline in the American mid-west to small Australian communities fighting for survival, Indigenous people are harnessing social media to take their stories global. Joe Brusky/Flickr

12 deadly Indigenous Australian social media users to follow

Indigenous people make up small percentages of the population in many countries – but using social media, Indigenous voices can be heard worldwide. Here are a dozen deadly Australians worth following.
Has anything changed in the 30 years since the ALRC’s Recognition of Aboriginal Customary Laws report? Mick Tsikas/AAP

From little things: the role of the Aboriginal customary law report in Mabo

The Recognition of Aboriginal Customary Laws examined the interaction between two legal systems – one based in British law and the other in the customary laws of the Aboriginal peoples of Australia.
Country provides a site where Aboriginal and mainstream forms of law can come together and have dialogue – an outcome made possible by Eddie Mabo (L). AAP/NAA

Law reports push piecemeal changes to native title, but still fall short

The ALRC report made some useful recommendations about how settler law could deal more fairly with Aboriginal people by taking their traditions and customs into account.
For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, constitutional change is about righting injustices inherent in the current recognition of difference, rather than promoting an agenda of sameness. Michael Coghlan/Flickr

On the wrong track: why Australia’s attempt at Indigenous reconciliation will fail

The process of constitutional recognition was initially to be completed by 2013, but is now being directed towards a referendum in May 2017 to mark the 50th anniversary of the 1967 referendum.
Success will come from changing the way Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s issues are talked about and addressed – from one of deficit in which people are described as problematic to one of empowerment and strength. Global Panorama/Flickr

Indigenous reconciliation in Australia: still a bridge too far?

In many ways, the "great Australian silence" about Indigenous history, pointed out by eminent anthropologist W.E.H. Stanner back in 1968, still endures in this country some 50 years later.
Native Americans have struggled for recognition of the violence done to them through colonisation and the persistent harms of settler colonialism. EPA/Mike Nelson

Indigenous reconciliation in the US shows how sovereignty and constitutional recognition work together

Despite significant shortcomings in the negotiation, content and honouring of treaties, they continue to define the nature of the relationship between most Native Americans and the United States.
A picture of strength: lifelong activist Bonita Mabo OA in front of her portrait as a young woman, which features in her granddaughter Boneta-Marie Mabo’s first solo exhibition. Josef Ruckli, courtesy of the State Library of Queensland

Black Velvet: redefining and celebrating Indigenous Australian women in art

Boneta-Marie Mabo's art responds to a colonial past in which Aboriginal women were fetishised as "black velvet". But it also celebrates strong women, including her activist grandmother Bonita Mabo.
In Ali Curung, 400km north of Alice Springs, the things that work for the community, including a local broadcasting and computer centre, are a response to local strengths and needs. AAP/Dan Peled

Ideas for Australia: Closing the gap is proving hard, but we can do better by working developmentally

In some Indigenous communities, the ratio of programs to people served is possibly the highest in the world. Somehow, for many, Closing the Gap remains an elusive goal. A rethink is needed.

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