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Ernest Hemingway with a bull near Pamplona, Spain in 1927, two years before ‘A Farewell to Arms’ would be published. Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

How a young Ernest Hemingway dealt with his first taste of fame

A newly published batch of Ernest Hemingway’s letters could change the way we think about the author's influences, relationships with other writers and views on race.
Edward Jenner, who pioneered vaccination, and two colleagues (right) seeing off three anti-vaccination opponents, with the dead lying at their feet (1808). I Cruikshank/Wellcome Images/Wikimedia Commons

A short history of vaccine objection, vaccine cults and conspiracy theories

Some people have objected to childhood vaccination since it was introduced in the late 1700s. And their reasons sound remarkably familiar to those of anti-vaxxers today.
A slave fortress in Cape Coast, Ghana. AP Photo/Clement N'Taye

A digital archive of slave voyages details the largest forced migration in history

An online database explores the nearly 36,000 slave voyages that occurred between 1514 and 1866.
Penny Gulliver wrote to Germaine Greer several times over two decades. University of Melbourne Archives, Germaine Greer Archive, 2014.0042.00350, Correspondence with Penny Gulliver

Friday essay: reading Germaine Greer’s mail

Fifty years of correspondence is stored at the Germaine Greer archive. It ranges across topics as diverse as US politics, grassroots feminism, gardening and Queen Victoria's underpants.
Both sea ice and government data are disappearing. U.S. Geological Survey, flickr

How the ‘guerrilla archivists’ saved history – and are doing it again under Trump

Activists today are racing to save climate records from the Trump administration. Secret archives were a powerful way to fight hostile political climates throughout history – from the Nazis to the Islamic State.
Gillian Armstrong’s 1971 student film The Roof Needs Mowing featured a bathtub full of baked beans. VCA Film & Television School

Magnetic memoir: a love letter to VHS from the archives

In less than a decade, most people won't be able to play a VHS tape anymore. Let's farewell the humble tape, and celebrate the archives finding their way to digitisation and YouTube.
Hex code from the Blaster worm reveals the potential motivations of the worm’s creator. Ward Moerman

Why save a computer virus?

How can archivists properly preserve computer programs often written specifically to destroy data?
Eastman Johnson’s ‘A Ride for Liberty’ (ca. 1862) depicts a family of slaves galloping for the safety of the North in the early morning light. Brooklyn Museum

In a digital archive of fugitive slave ads, a new portrait of slavery emerges

With Freedom on the Move, historians hope to reveal patterns of escape and capture, while giving anyone the chance to learn about the individual heroism of runaway slaves.
Transgender is an umbrella term, encompassing a number of different identities and practices. 'Umbrella' via www.shutterstock.com

What’s in a word? The challenges of ‘transgender’

Transgender is a relatively new word. So when an academic seeks to create a transgender historical archive, complications abound.
The State Library of Victoria has received the greatest single bequest of rare books in its history. Teagan Glenane

Emmerson’s bequest offers the best of the best for book scholars

The State Library of Victoria has received the greatest single bequest of rare books in its history, coupled with an endowment for the collection's preservation. No wonder book scholars are smiling.
We don’t send as many letters these days but, as historians know, there’s nothing quite as resilient. Ben/Flickr

Hold the post: there’s no such thing as a dead letter

Australians might now prefer to send emails over private letters but let's not overlook the letter’s unique, tactile role, particularly in its most intimate expressions.

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