Articles on Sleep

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We now have the technology to do track our sleep through the night, but that may be doing more harm than good. Marisa/Flickr

Health Check: is your sleep app keeping you up at night?

Tracking sleep is now routine in monitoring overall well-being. But are the devices used to do this actually useful, or have we simply found a more sophisticated way to clock watch?
Popular characters such as Sleeping Beauty illustrate our enduring interest in tales of people who sleep continuously or cannot stay awake. Sofi/flickr

The big sleep: science is waking up to the curious story of narcolepsy

Perhaps because we all need sleep, we have an enduring interest in sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, which causes a constant irrepressible need for sleep.
The activities we do during the day – from having a fight with a partner to using our iPhones at night – also affect our hormone levels and, in turn, our quality of sleep. Jan Faukner/Shutterstock

Chemical messengers: how hormones help us sleep

Sleep allows many of our hormones to replenish so we have the optimal energy, immunity, appetite and coping ability to face the day’s highs and lows.
Limiting screen time before bedtime is beneficial for sleep. shutterstock

Why screen time before bed is bad for children

Screen time – by way of watching television or using computers, mobile phones and other electronic mobile devices – may be having a large and negative impact on children’s sleep.
You can do a lot while you sleep. Woman via www.shutterstock.com.

Can we unlearn social biases while we sleep?

We strengthen memories while we sleep, and researchers have found a way to cue that process to help people better retain information that counters implicit biases.
Light from electronic devices can alter the quality of sleep our quality. Alexander Rentsch/Flickr

Booting up or powering down: how e-readers affect your sleep

While many of these devices, especially e-readers, seem harmless enough, the light they emit may affect our sleep patterns and leave us feeling tired the next day.
Older adults have less deep sleep than younger people and it’s more easily interrupted. Image Point Fr/Shutterstock

Good sleep gets harder as we age, but mindfulness could help

By learning to become more aware of present-moment experiences, we learn not to react to thoughts and worries that can interfere with sleep.
Time spent checking the clock when you can’t sleep may be feeding your insomnia. bark/Flickr

Explainer: what is insomnia and what can you do about it?

We all have a poor night’s sleep from time to time: those nights when you lie awake for hours trying desperately to go to sleep but can’t stop worrying about tomorrow. Or when you repeatedly wake up throughout…
The best way to keep your hand off the snooze button is to have a regular sleep schedule every day of the week. Bethan/Flickr

Morning haze: why it’s time to stop hitting the snooze button

It’s 6.30am and after a long holiday break, your alarm clock is insistently telling you it’s time to get out of bed. For many people – me included – the automatic reaction is to hit the snooze button…

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