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Articles on Avian flu H5N1

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture has confirmed that dairy cows in nine states have been infected with bird flu in 2024. U.S. Department of Agriculture

Bird flu detected in Colorado dairy cattle − a vet explains the risks of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus

A veterinarian and epidemiologist who studies infectious diseases in dairy cows discusses the outbreak, how cows recover and what the government is doing to keep the milk supply safe.
Strong evidence suggests the risk associated with consuming milk contaminated with H5N1 influenza virus is minimal. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

U.S. has found H5N1 flu virus in milk — here’s why the risk to humans is likely low

H5N1 influenza has been reported in dairy cows, and detected in milk. Here’s a look at what’s known about how pasteurization affects the virus and the safety of consuming H5N1-contaminated milk.
Cows typically get over avian flu in a couple of weeks, but it’s an economic blow for farms. AP Photo/Charlie Litchfield

How bird flu virus fragments get into milk sold in stores, and what the spread of H5N1 in cows means for the dairy industry and milk drinkers

Five livestock experts who study infectious diseases in the dairy industry explain the risks.
The World Health Organization has declared an end to COVID-19’s status as a public health emergency of international concern. (Shutterstock)

Learning from COVID-19: The global health emergency has ended. Here’s what is needed to prepare for the next one

After previous public health emergencies likes SARS and H1N1, there was renewed investment in pandemic preparedness, but it was not sustained. We cannot make the same mistake after COVID-19.
Gain-of-function experiments in the lab can help researchers get ahead of viruses naturally gaining the ability to infect people in the wild. KTSDesign/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

Gain-of-function research is more than just tweaking risky viruses – it’s a routine and essential tool in all biology research

From cancer immunotherapy and antibiotics to GMO crops and pandemic surveillance, gain of function is a cornerstone of basic research.
Avian influenza (‘bird flu’) is a highly transmissible and usually mild disease that affects wild birds such as geese, swans, seagulls, shorebirds, and also domestic birds such as chickens and turkeys. (CDC and NIAID)

Bird flu FAQ: What is avian influenza? How is it transmitted to humans? What are the symptoms? Are there effective treatments and vaccines? Will H5N1 become the next viral pandemic?

Avian influenza — commonly known as ‘bird flu’ — is infecting domestic and wild birds in Canada and around the world.
Bird flu is transmitted mainly by wild birds, like these snow geese in Ruthsberg, Md., in January 2023. Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

As bird flu continues to spread in the US and worldwide, what’s the risk that it could start a human pandemic? 4 questions answered

Avian influenza viruses have evolved to infect birds, but the current H5N1 outbreak is also infecting a wide range of mammals. This suggests that it could mutate into forms that threaten humans.
Wild birds like pelicans and ducks are getting infected with – and dying from – a new strain of avian influenza and have spread it to farm animals around the world. Klebher Vasquez/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

What is spillover? Bird flu outbreak underscores need for early detection to prevent the next big pandemic

A biologist who studies how viruses spread from animals to people explains the process of spillover and the risks posed by the new bird flu that has spread across the globe.

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