Articles on Chronic disease

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Smartphones make great citizen research tools. We take them everywhere and they have the functions (GPS, accelerometers, camera, audio, video) to sense, share and mobilize data between consenting citizens. (Shutterstock)

How your smartphone can encourage active living

We blame electronic devices for our increasingly sedentary behaviours. So why not harness them to study our movement patterns and tackle urgent health crises?
Syrian refugee family Mohammad Al Mnajer and wife Fouzia Al Hashish sit with their three daughters Judy, second left, Jaidaa, far right, and Baylasan as they eat their after school snack at their home in Mississauga, Ont., in December 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Immigrant children’s health declines rapidly after arrival in Canada

Research shows that many immigrants are healthier than Canadians when they arrive in the country. The longer they stay, the more their health declines.
One recent study revealed no evidence that selenium supplements help prevent diabetes, even in geographical areas where there are relatively low amounts of selenium in the natural diet. (Shutterstock)

Why you should stop buying vitamins and get more sleep instead

Most vitamins and other nutritional supplements are unlikely to prevent chronic disease. Invest in good quality foods, sleep and exercise instead.
Clinical research has established exercise as a safe and effective intervention to counteract the adverse physical and psychological effects of cancer and its treatment. The Clinical Oncology Society of Australia is the first to recommend exercise as part of regular cancer care. (Unsplash/curtis macnewton)

Exercise is medicine, and doctors are starting to prescribe it

From weekend walks with your doctor to free gym memberships, there is a global movement afoot.
Women who have had a heart attack are less likely to be given an angiogram (a special X-ray to detect blockages of the heart), rehabilitation, or medication than men. Shutterstock/Syda Productions

Women who have heart attacks receive poorer care than men

New research shows women receive sub-optimal care after they have a heart attack and are twice as likely than men to die six months after the attack.
Manipulating environmental exposures to optimize a healthy microbiome may hold the promise of preventing chronic inflammatory diseases, such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. (Shutterstock)

Why we all need to be proactive about our bowels

Halting the rapid rise in inflammatory bowel disease will require a proactive approach to medicine, and a focus on the gut.
Exposure to omega-3 fatty acids during a child’s early years may play a role in reducing breast cancer risk later in life. (Shutterstock)

How fish may reduce your child’s breast cancer risk

New research suggests omega-3s from seafood to be more effective at reducing breast cancer risk than those from plant-based sources.
Taxing sugar places the burden on the poor – people who are already burdened by higher rates of heart disease, obesity and diabetes. (Shutterstock)

How sugar taxes punish the people

Sugar taxes fail to tackle the root of the problem -- the production and marketing of foods that cause chronic disease.
The largest differences in early death between those with and without mental disorders were for respiratory diseases and alcohol misuse. Jake Oates

People with mental illness still die a decade earlier than those without

Despite efforts to address the issue, the life expectancy gap between those with and without mental illness has remained consistent over two decades. However the causes of death have changed.

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