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Articles sur Biomedical devices

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Tiny fuel cells convert sweat to electricity that can power sensors in electronic skin. Yu et al., Sci. Robot. 5, eaaz7946 (2020)

A smart second skin gets all the power it needs from sweat

Lightweight, flexible materials can be used to make health-monitoring wearable devices, but powering the devices is a challenge. Using fuel cells instead of batteries could make the difference.
Monaco and Japan have some of the highest life expectancies in the world. But calculating an individual’s life expectancy will require taking data analysis several steps further. SHUTTERSTOCK

Don’t die wondering: apps may soon be able to predict your life expectancy, but do you want to know?

Predicting life expectancy remains in the realm of science fiction, but it may soon be possible. Are we prepared for such information? And who else would benefit from this knowledge?
Biomedical innovations can work with traditional methods like x-rays to guide doctors’ decisions. Reuters/Adriane Ohanesian

Africa needs to start creating its own medical technology. Here’s how

African countries need to start producing and developing their own medical devices. Suitably skilled biomedical engineers are needed for this sort of innovation to take root.
Biomedical engineering involves the application of engineering solutions to medical problems. Employment in the field is projected to grow 23 per cent from 2014 to 2024. (Shutterstock)

A war made me realize: The world needs biomedical engineers

One professor explains how war in Iran led her to a career in biomedical engineering - a rapidly growing field that offers students exciting opportunities to serve humanity.
A subject plays a computer game as part of a neural security experiment at the University of Washington. Patrick Bennett

Helping or hacking? Engineers and ethicists must work together on brain-computer interface technology

BCI devices that read minds and act on intentions can change lives for the better. But they could also be put to nefarious use in the not-too-distant future. Now's the time to think about risks.
Will your cellphone be able to communicate with bacteria in your body? Bacteria image via www.shutterstock.com.

Using electricity, not molecules, to switch cells on and off

New research works out how to translate between the language of biology – molecules – and the language of microelectronics – electrons. It could open the door to new kinds of biosensors and therapeutics.

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