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Articles sur NFL

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Sacramento Kings players kneel in support of the Black Lives Matter movement before an NBA basketball game, August 6, 2020. GettyImages

Athlete activism or corporate woke washing? Getting it right in the age of Black Lives Matter is a tough game

Brands taking a stand on social issues is no longer remarkable — but that only makes it harder to be authentic.
Seattle Seahawks quarterback Rick Mirer (3) is sacked for a seven-yard-loss by Kevin Henry (76) of the Pittsburgh Steelers during the second quarter of their NFL game on Dec. 26, 1993. (AP Photos/Gary Stewart)

NFL concussion lawsuit payouts reveal how racial bias in science continues

In the NFL, anti-Black racism shows up in the disparities between concussion settlements to injured athletes. The amounts of the payouts are determined using assessments that rely on racist science.
It has always been folly to believe that sports were separate from power and politics. AP Photo/Terrance Williams

The numbers behind America’s 180 on athlete activism

For decades, athletes, as a general rule, steered clear of politics. Teams and sponsors liked it that way, and fans did, too. No more.
Some sports teams in the United States and Canada have finally abandoned the use of racist team names and logos. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson)

Applying corporate pressure to change racist team names isn’t enough

Putting pressure on corporate sponsors is a tactic that has worked when it comes to changing racist team names. But it's not enough to address systemic racism.
The NFL has been thrust into conversations around criminal justice since Colin Kaepernick and others chose to kneel in protest against police violence, but also in the case of former player Aaron Hernandez. AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

How portrayals of the NFL are shaping criminal justice reform

From Super Bowl ads to Netflix documentaries, the complicated issues of criminal justice are portrayed in simplistic and highly political ways.
Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes celebrates after his team won the NFL divisional playoff football game against the Houston Texans on Jan. 12, 2020. AP Photo/Charlie Riedel

How sports fans respond to their teams’ wavering odds of winning

Watching the chances of victory change injects life into sports, both real and fantasy.
Cleveland Browns defensive end Myles Garrett (95) hits Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph (2) with a helmet during a National Football League game Nov. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/David Richard)

Myles Garrett, Don Cherry and the changing nature of the sports boys club

Attempts to disrupt or challenge normative, sporty masculinity has been met by outrage by those who cannot see nor hear the tribalism and male privilege of masculinized spaces like locker rooms.
Samoan-American quarterback Tua Tagovailoa is a preseason favorite to win the Heisman Trophy, college football’s top award. AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

I traveled to American Samoa 5 times to study the secret to its football success

A key tenet of Samoan culture emphasizes community, deference to authority and confronting fears – a mindset that makes an ideal football player. But it can extract a physical toll.
Hotels and motels along major highways are common spots for sex trafficking. Ken Stocker/shutterstock.com

Sex trafficking in the US: 4 questions answered

New England Patriots CEO Robert Kraft's criminal charges in a suspected sex trafficking case draw new attention to this illicit underground economy.
Los Angeles Rams head coach Sean McVay, left, shakes hands with New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

Belichick versus McVay: An age-old question of leadership

Even though young leaders and old leaders may have different approaches, one isn't necessarily better than the other. But in order to succeed, a leader better be able to bridge generational divides.
During Super Bowl LIII, will Atlanta’s long struggle for racial equality be highlighted or glossed over? Peter Ciro/flickr

Super Bowl LIII and the soul of Atlanta

The country's 'Black Mecca' is hosting the Super Bowl. With the NFL's national anthem controversy still lingering, this creates an undeniable paradox.
A Green Bay Packers fan wears a cheese hat reading ‘NFL Owner’ – a nod to the fans’ public ownership of the franchise. Darren Hauck/Reuters

Green Bay Packers fans love that their team doesn’t have an owner – just don’t call it ‘communism’

Many Americans seem to like seeing communist ideas in action, but have a visceral reaction to the word ‘communism.’ Might it be time to refresh an old ideology with a new set of terms?

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