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Members of a ground crew In Phoenix wrapped wet towels around their necks to cool off when the temperature reached a record of 116°F. Matt York/AP Photo

3 dangers of rising temperatures that could affect your health now

Rising temperatures will not only hurt people in the future. Many are feeling the effects now. Those who work outdoors, those who have certain chronic conditions and the elderly are vulnerable.
Thomas Johnson drinks Gatorade at a ‘Beat the Heat’ event the company sponsored in Fort Worth, Texas, June 10, 2013. Brandon Wade/Invision for Gatorade/AP Photo

Overhydrating presents health hazards for young football players

Yes, it's hot outside. And football practice is starting for thousands of kids. But coaches and parents should be careful about tellings kids to drink more water. That has been deadly.
Green rooftops give a backyard feel to smaller housing units in Sydney Author Provided

Australian cities are lagging behind in greening up their buildings

Research shows if Australia encourages greenery on buildings, it will reduce temperatures in the city, as well as potential for flash flooding. It also creates new habitats and socialising spaces.
Some materials and surfaces radiate much more heat (red areas) than others, as can be seen in this thermal image of Arncliffe Street in Wolli Creek, Sydney.

Building cool cities for a hot future

Hot spots occur at the scale of where people live – the building, the street, the block – which means urban design and building materials have profound implications for our health and well-being.
Despite adjustments to temperature data in the Arctic, the overall global warming trend remains the same. Flickr/P J Hansen

Global warming trend unaffected by ‘fiddling’ with temperature data

Attacks on institutions that keep records of global temperatures, such as NASA, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the UK Met Office, and Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology, continue…
When it gets hot in the city, where’s the best place to go? Alpha/Flickr

Smart urban design could save lives in future heatwaves

Heatwaves — Australia’s biggest natural killers — are getting more frequent and hotter thanks to climate change. One day cities such as Melbourne may see unprecedented heat, perhaps 48C or higher. But…
A new study finds overwhelming odds that humans have contributed to higher global temperatures – so how much are we willing to gamble that it’s wrong? Kraevski Vitaly/Shutterstock

99.999% certainty humans are driving global warming: new study

There is less than 1 chance in 100,000 that global average temperature over the past 60 years would have been as high without human-caused greenhouse gas emissions, our new research shows. Published in…
It’s getting hot in here: temperatures soar across inland and eastern Australia around 2pm today. http://www.bom.gov.au/australia/meteye/

It’s a scorcher: new site tracks heatwaves across Australia

As much of inland and eastern Australia sweats through its first heatwave of the summer, a new interactive website has been launched to track where the heat is coming from and to map past heatwaves across…

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