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Articles on Bureau of Meteorology

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It’s the first time since overlapping records began that Australia experienced both its lowest rainfall and highest temperatures in the same year. dan HIMBRECHTS/AAP

Weather bureau says hottest, driest year on record led to extreme bushfire season

The Bureau of Meterology says persistent drought and record temperatures were a major driver of Australia's fire activity, and the context for 2019 lies in the past three years of drought.
Cyclones Trevor and Veronica hit north Australia in 2019. NASA Earth Observatory handout/EPA/AAP

I’ve always wondered: how do cyclones get their names?

In 1887 Queensland’s chief weatherman Clement Wragge began naming tropical cyclones, using names from the Greek alphabet, fabulous beasts and politicians who annoyed him.
Meteorologists use their own experience, which helps them to decide whether the computer’s prediction is likely to be right. AAP Image/Chris Pavlich

Curious Kids: how do people know what the weather will be?

Twice every day the Bureau of Meteorology sends out the official weather forecasts for towns and cities across Australia. Here's how we work out what to say in them.
Maximum temperatures for January to September were the warmest on record for the Murray–Darling Basin and New South Wales. DEAN LEWINS/AAP

Australia moves to El Niño alert and the drought is likely to continue

After the warmest month on record, it looks like Australia will have an El Niño event – which means the drought is likely to continue.
Sometimes air goes up past the condensation level then falls back below the condensation level, then up, then below, again and again. This creates clouds that are stripy, often with lines between the clouds. Robert Lawry/Author provided

Curious Kids: where do clouds come from and why do they have different shapes?

Clouds formed by rising warm air currents are called 'convection clouds'. Because of all the rising air coming up, these clouds can be bumpy on top, sometimes looking like cotton wool or cauliflower.

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