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Articles on Collections

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Campus shutdowns mean researchers must be classified as essential personnel to tend collections, like these fungus-colonized plants. Cameron Stauder

Scientists are working to protect invaluable living collections during coronavirus lockdowns

From fungi and flies to spiders and fish, living collections need care and feeding even when their human keepers are dealing with a pandemic and its resultant social distancing.
Civil rights leader Wyatt Tee Walker addresses a crowd at St. Phillips AME Church in Atlanta. Afro American Newspapers/Gado/Getty Images

How civil rights leader Wyatt Tee Walker revived hope after MLK’s death

In a sermon two weeks after MLK's funeral, civil rights leader, Wyatt Tee Walker, urged young seminarians to be hopeful and take action for making change happen. His sermon has valuable lessons today.
Photographer Ansel Adams poses on a bluff with his camera. Roger Ressmeyer/CORBIS/VCG via Getty Images

The surprising source of Ansel Adams’ signature style

Largely self-taught, Adams learned to harness the communicative power of photography during his years as a marketing photographer.
Two Marines in the Marine Corps’ 5th Division cemetery on Iwo Jima pay their respects to a fallen comrade. United States Marine Corps Film Repository, USMC 101863 (16mm film frame)

Historic Iwo Jima footage shows individual Marines amid the larger battle

Films of the battle for Iwo Jima, being digitized 75 years after they were made, offer connections and lessons for Americans of today.
With over 100 issues, ‘Young Love’ was one of the longest running romance comics series. Gary Lee Watson Comic Book Collection, Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, University of South Carolina Libraries

America’s postwar fling with romance comics

During the 'love glut,' roughly 1 in 5 of all comic books were romance comics, as publishers scrambled to appease readers' appetites for scandalous storylines.
A looted Jewish shop in Aachen, Germany on the day after Kristallnacht, Nov. 10, 1938. Wolf Gruner and Armin Nolzen (eds.). 'Bürokratien: Initiative und Effizienz,' Berlin, 2001.

The forgotten mass destruction of Jewish homes during ‘Kristallnacht’

Most histories highlight the shattered storefronts and synagogues set aflame. But it was the systematic ransacking of Jewish homes that extracted the greatest toll.
Idi Amin at a press conference in Jjaja Marina, Uganda in July 1975. Courtesy of the Uganda Broadcasting Corporation

Thousands of recently discovered photographs document life in Uganda during Idi Amin’s reign

Hidden for decades in a vault at the Uganda Broadcasting Corporation, the photographs depict a regime fixated on establishing order, meting out punishment and stoking nationalism.
Pfc Elias Friedensohn in June 1945 at the Special Services Distributing Point, Seine Section, Paris, France. National Archives

The American GI in WWII, uncensored

An unprecedented survey of US GIs that began in 1941, preserved on microfilm, provides a raw and uncensored story of average Americans grappling with both national ideals and practical necessities.
Thurgood Marshall outside the Supreme Court in Washington in 1958. Marshall, the head of the NAACP’s legal arm who argued part of the case, went on to become the Supreme Court’s first African-American justice. AP

The Brown v. Board of Education case didn’t start how you think it did

While the Brown vs. Board of Education case is often celebrated for ordering school desegregation, history shows many black people in the city where the case began opposed integrated schools.
Members of East Baltimore Church of God, which was founded by Lumbee Indians, and was once located in the heart of ‘the reservation,’ in the 1700 block of E. Baltimore Street. Photo courtesy of Rev. Robert E. Dodson Jr., Pastor, East Baltimore Church of God

A quest to reconstruct Baltimore’s American Indian ‘reservation’

A folklorist is working to preserve the history of a unique, urban community of Lumbee Indians.
Preliminary drawing of title page for ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ (New York: Harper & Row, 1963), 26:7, The Maurice Sendak Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Library. © The Maurice Sendak Foundation.

From ‘Wild Horses’ to ‘Wild Things,’ a window into Maurice Sendak’s creative process

The book took eight years from conception to publication. In the earliest dummy, the monsters that millions have grown to love actually started out as horses.

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