Italy – Analysis and Comment

A nursing home resident in Rome is moved to a hospital. Mauro Scrobogna/LaPresse via AP

5 reasons the coronavirus hit Italy so hard

The coronavirus found dangerously fertile ground in elements of the country's demographics, business, geography and culture.
On November 12, 2019, in Venise, the sea rose 1.87 metres above its normal level, flooding much of the city. Ihor Serdyukov/Shutterstock

Notre-Dame and Venice: why such a gap in generosity?

More than 1 billion euros were donated after Paris’ cathedral was grievously damaged by fire in April. By comparison, just a few million euros were given after catastrophic flooding in Cité des Doges.
A migrant rests on a Mediterranea Saving Humans NGO boat as it sails off Italy’s southernmost island of Lampedusa, just outside Italian territorial waters, on July 4, 2019. Despite being rescued, migrants sit offshore, often in sight of land, as NGO boats become floating mobile border sites. (AP Photo/Olmo Calvo)

Standoffs at sea highlight the shameful criminalization of rescuing migrants

Standoffs at sea represent yet another attempt by EU officials to obstruct the movement of migrants by producing further bureaucratic blockades to mobility.
Migrants rest on a Mediterranea Saving Humans NGO boat as they sail off Italy’s southernmost island of Lampedusa, just outside Italian territorial waters, on July 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Olmo Calvo)

People are drowning at sea. Why aren’t we saving them?

Authorities in Italy would sooner turn ships carrying migrants back to strife-torn countries like Libya rather than allow them to seek asylum. It's amounting to repeated Voyages of the Damned.