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Artículos sobre Brain damage

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Brain damage linked to concussions in football can resemble that found in elderly and comatose patients but there may be ways to prevent it so the sport continues. Toronto Argonauts’ Jeffrey Finley, left, rushes to take down Calgary Stampeders’ quarterback Bo Levi Mitchell in this August file photo. ( THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh)

Grey Cup haunted by brain injury risk — but doesn’t have to be

Concussions in football and other contact sports correlate with severe, long-term brain damage — but science shows it doesn’t have to be that way.
Heavy alcohol consumption over ten years or more can cause significant brain function problems. But what about casual drinking? Robert Mathews/Unsplash

Research Check: can even moderate drinking cause brain damage?

New research shows an association between moderate drinking and long-term brain impairment. But there are a few reasons to be cautious about these findings.
People with traumatic brain injuries, say after a car accident or an assault, can have behavioural problems long after their physical injuries have healed. from www.shutterstock.com

Explainer: what is traumatic brain injury?

Survivors of traumatic brain injuries might have behavioural issues or have problems holding down a job for years after a blow to the head or a bad fall.
Basil Hetzel’s research supported the use of iodised salt as an easy way to ensure adequate dietary iodine intake. from www.shutterstock.com

Basil Hetzel: Australian medical pioneer, and my friend

Public health pioneer Basil Hetzel died on February 4 2017. Among other career highlights, he identified the most common cause of preventable brain damage: dietary iodine deficiency.
The majority of women stop drinking in their second trimester. pregnant woman with wine from shutterstock.com

Women aren’t following advice to stop drinking when pregnant

Around 40% of Australian women drink alcohol while pregnant, despite medical guidelines recommending they don’t.
MRIs of 9,000 people have shown that depression shrinks parts of the brain. from shutterstock.com

Depression damages parts of the brain, research concludes

Brain damage is caused by persistent depression rather than being a predisposing factor for it, researchers have finally concluded after decades of unconfirmed hypothesising.

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