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Artículos sobre One Health

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The actions we take now will determine whether the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 outbreak already affecting birds and mammals around the world takes hold in humans. (AP Photo/Erin Hooley)

An ounce of prevention: Now is the time to take action on H5N1 avian flu, because the stakes are enormous

Our approach to combating pandemics must shift to one that prioritizes prevention of human infections with zoonotic viruses, rather than focusing on rapid response once human infection is widespread.
Social sciences play a key role in preventing zoonotic diseases from spreading to people from animals. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Why ‘One Health’ needs more social sciences: Pandemic prevention depends on behaviour as well as biology

Pandemics often have animal origins, so prevention is often dominated by health and veterinary sciences. However, social sciences’ role in understanding human behaviour is also crucial to prevention.
While antimicrobial resistance is a threat to all humanity, a tale of two worlds emerges, highlighting the heightened vulnerability of low- and middle-income countries. (Shutterstock)

Antimicrobial resistance now hits lower-income countries the hardest, but superbugs are a global threat we must all fight

The contrasting realities of antimicrobial resistance between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries demands international co-operation to effectively fight superbugs.
West Nile virus is spread by mosquitoes. About 80 per cent of infected people have no symptoms, but the virus can cause encephalitis and can be life-threatening. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

What Canadians need to know about West Nile virus, a mosquito-borne infection that can be life-threatening

West Nile virus arrived in North America in 1999 and spread across the continent by 2005. Here’s what you need to know about this mosquito-borne pathogen.
Learning how to treat endocrine disorders in horses may also lead to treatments in people, and vice versa. Catherine Falls Commercial/Moment via Getty Images

Horse health research will help humans stay healthy, too, with insights on reining in diabetes and obesity

Horses and humans share biological similarities that lead them to suffer from similar endocrine and orthopedic diseases. A number of treatments that work for one species often work for the other.
Avian influenza (‘bird flu’) is a highly transmissible and usually mild disease that affects wild birds such as geese, swans, seagulls, shorebirds, and also domestic birds such as chickens and turkeys. (CDC and NIAID)

Bird flu FAQ: What is avian influenza? How is it transmitted to humans? What are the symptoms? Are there effective treatments and vaccines? Will H5N1 become the next viral pandemic?

Avian influenza — commonly known as ‘bird flu’ — is infecting domestic and wild birds in Canada and around the world.
Egypt’s Foreign Minister Sameh Shukri, heads the closing session of the COP27 climate conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. Joseph Eid/AFP

Is liberal governance unable to deal with global threats?

The absence of norms defining the common good and the insufficient place of scientific arguments in the democratic debate weaken the capacity of liberalism to face global threats.
The strain of H5N1 bird flu identified in Canada, the United States and Europe can cause severe disease and high mortality in domestic poultry. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Avian influenza: How bird flu affects domestic and wild flocks, and why a One Health approach matters

Avian influenza virus — or bird flu — can infect domestic poultry such as chickens and turkeys, as well as wild birds. The H5N1 strain has been identified in Canada.
The sticky biofilms that form on microplastics can harbor disease-causing pathogens and help them spread. Tunatura/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Disease-causing parasites can hitch a ride on plastics and potentially spread through the sea, new research suggests

Normally land-bound pathogens that cause deadly diseases for both humans and animals can cling to microplastics and end up in your seafood.
COVID-19 will not be the last infectious disease event of our time. We need to prepare for the next challenge with evidence and knowledge. (Shutterstock)

Future infectious diseases: Recent history shows we can never again be complacent about pathogens

Before COVID-19, clean water, antibiotics and vaccines had made us complacent about infectious disease. Infection control can no longer be taken for granted. We must be prepared for future pandemics.
There is only ‘one health’ — the health of all living organisms in a global ecosystem that, when rapidly altered and imbalanced, puts us all at risk for future pandemics. (Canva)

One Health: A crucial approach to preventing and preparing for future pandemics

One Health recognizes the interrelations between the health of humans, other animals, and their shared environments. It should be integrated in the international treaty on pandemics.
Disturbing the habitats of horseshoe bats, like these in Borneo, increases the risk of virus spillover. Mike Prince/Flickr

Preventing future pandemics starts with recognizing links between human and animal health

How can nations prevent more pandemics like COVID-19? One priority is reducing the risk of diseases’ jumping from animals to humans. And that means understanding how human actions fuel that risk.
Albanian health department workers, wearing protective suits, collect chickens, in the village of Peze Helmes some 20 km from the capital Tirana, 23 March 2006, after the second case of H5N1 bird flu was discovered in Albania. Gent Shkullaku / AFP

The keys to preventing future pandemics

Ever since the 2001 SARS outbreak and H5N1 avian flu in 2003, we’ve developed tools to monitor diseases that transmitted from animals to humans. But what does a large-scale roll-out entail?
The EUV-SK1, developed by One Health Medical Technologies with subject matter experts from the University of Saskatchewan. (RMD Engineering, Inc.)

Keeping it local: The story behind a made-in-Saskatchewan COVID-19 emergency-use ventilator

How a veterinarian and a law professor joined a multidisciplinary team to help produce a made-in-Saskatchewan emergency-use ventilator during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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