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Artikel-artikel mengenai Fish

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Harajicadectes cruises through the ancient rivers of central Australia ~385 million years ago. Brian Choo

A 380-million-year old predatory fish from Central Australia is finally named after decades of digging

For decades, the sandstone in central Australia yielded tantalising segments of some sort of fossil fish. Now, we have finally pieced together a complete picture of this remarkable species.
Blue sharks are popular targets of a catch-and-release fishery along the southern coast of England. Vladimir Turkenich/Shutterstock

How trophy fishing can have a sustainable future

Trophy fishing is a big threat to some of the most threatened species of fish, but there are ways to adapt the sport with marine conservation in mind.
Pok Rie/Pexel

Governments spend US$22 billion a year helping the fishing industry empty our oceans. This injustice must end

Governments all over the world are propping up overfishing. Now scientists have penned an open letter calling on trade ministers to implement stricter regulations against harmful fisheries subsidies.
Artist reconstruction of Alienacanthus malkowskii, a 365-million-year-old placoderm fish from Poland and Morocco. (Beat Scheffold & Christian Klug)

A 365-million-year-old fish with an extreme underbite showcases vertebrate diversity

What paleontologists had believed to be spiny fins turned out to be elongated jaws. New examination of fossils that were 365 million years old revealed a fish with a remarkable lower jaw.
The bow of the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Duane, a decommissioned ship deliberately sunk off Florida to serve as an artificial reef. Stephen Frink via Getty Images

Not all underwater reefs are made of coral − the US has created artificial reefs from sunken ships, radio towers, boxcars and even voting machines

Artificial reefs are structures that humans put in place underwater that create habitat for sea life. A new study shows for the first time how much of the US ocean floor they cover.
Rather than a tracking tag telling scientists where this shark traveled, its violent removal let them observe an unexpected regeneration process. Josh Schellenberg

I set out to investigate where silky sharks travel − and by chance documented a shark’s amazing power to regenerate its sabotaged fin

After scientists’ GPS tracking tag was violently removed from one shark’s dorsal fin, they were in for a surprise: The wound didn’t just heal, but the missing tissue grew back.
A school of grunts on a sunken World War II German submarine in the Atlantic Ocean off North Carolina. Karen Doody/Stocktrek Images via Getty Images

Shipwrecks teem with underwater life, from microbes to sharks

When ships sink, they add artificial structures to the seafloor that can quickly become diverse, ecologically important underwater communities.
Canals carry PFAS into Miami’s Biscayne Bay. Art Wager/E+ via Getty Images

PFAS ‘forever chemicals’ are getting into ocean ecosystems, where dolphins, fish and manatees dine – we traced their origins

Scientists found PFAS hot spots in Miami’s Biscayne Bay where the chemicals are entering coastal waters and reaching the ocean. Water samples point to some specific sources.
The industrialization of the fishing industry and changes in the environment have raised many issues about the management of our fisheries. (Fanny Fronton)

Gulf of St. Lawrence: Analyzing fish blood can show us how healthy they are

Blood isn’t sterile, and analyzing the bacteria in it could help assess the health of fish and prevent the collapse of their populations.
Rising temperatures are not just directly lethal to fish but also result in hormonal imbalances which threaten entire populations. (Jonathan Munera L.)

How climate change-induced stress is altering fish hormones — with huge repercussions for reproduction

Climate change is causing higher levels of stress in fish, and the resulting hormonal imbalances are fundamentally altering entire populations.

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