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University of Manitoba

The University of Manitoba has thrived for 140 years as a place where students come to learn, be inspired and find their voice. We are Manitoba’s largest, most comprehensive university and its only research-intensive post-secondary institution. Our research facilities foster collaboration and scholarship in areas including Arctic system science and climate change; immunity, inflammation and infectious disease; population and global health; culture and creative works; and Indigenous research.

At the U of M we are taking our place among leading universities through a commitment to transformative research and scholarship, and innovative teaching and learning, uniquely strengthened by Indigenous knowledge and perspectives.

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Displaying 21 - 40 of 208 articles

An ethicist calls the government’s decision to not support a search for murdered Indigenous women immoral. Pictured here is a protest to support the search in Winnipeg. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods)

A moral argument to search the landfill in Winnipeg for murdered Indigenous women

Manitoba’s provincial government has declined to support a search for three murdered Indigenous women, citing health and safety concerns. An ethicist explains why this decision needs to be rethought.
Beyond the danger to human life and economies, wildfires also present considerable danger to communities and the mental well-being of survivors. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Wildfire evacuations: How our diverse experiences can strengthen disaster response

To effectively address climate hazards like wildfire, we must consider the diverse experiences of people, account for longstanding institutions and create processes that empower local people.
The intersection along the Trans-Canada highway near Carberry, Man. where a bus collided with a semi-truck killing 16 people and injuring nine others. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

After the Manitoba crash, Canada needs to rethink bus safety

Safety investigations into serious road collisions need to be conducted at a national level and by an independent body in the same manner air and rail occurrences are investigated.
Language is so important, says prof. Frank Deer. Generational knowledge of culture is passed through stories, language, and symbols. Here two young women wearing ribbon skirts arrive for 2022 National Day for Truth and Reconciliation ceremonies in Calgary, Alta. (CP/Jeff McIntosh)

Listen: Why preserving Indigenous languages is so critical to culture

The revitalization of Indigenous languages is essential because language reflects philosophies that guide social, political, cultural and ecological relationships.
Edmonton Oilers left wing Evander Kane is congratulated after scoring his third goal against the Seattle Kraken during the third period of an NHL hockey game on March 18, 2023, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

What a viral meme about Evander Kane can tell us about white supremacy in hockey

The viral Kane vs. Karen meme invites the viewer to see the parallels between the actions of a white female hockey fan, surrounded by white onlookers, towards a Black player surrounded by referees.
The aptly-titled video ‘Canceling,’ by cultural commentator and YouTuber ContraPoints, crystallized the cancellation video genre. (Wikipedia)

Cancel culture: YouTube videos on ‘getting cancelled’ are now their own genre and have links to the past

What do YouTuber influencer videos about being ‘cancelled’ share with 17th-century texts? Both were crafted directly in response to audiences in new social spaces.
Strategies that may help reduce support for corporal punishment — as well as reduce its use and intentions to use it — include individual and group-based programs to develop positive parenting skills. (Shutterstock)

Time to abolish the Canadian law that allows adults to spank and hit children

Extensive evidence shows the harms of spanking, and 65 other countries or states worldwide have already banned it. Why has Canada not done the same by repealing Section 43 of the Criminal Code?
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Squamish Nation councillor Khelsilem hold a ceremonial paddle after a groundbreaking ceremony at the First Nation’s Sen̓áḵw housing development site in Vancouver in September 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

First Nations are using ‘creative disruption’ to foster economic growth in their communities

By starting their own entrepreneurial and developmental projects, First Nations are working toward economic prosperity for their communities and furthering reconciliation.
Research found that investor ownership of farmland in Saskatchewan was negligible in 2002, but by 2018 had climbed to nearly one million acres — almost 18 times the size of Saskatoon. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Growing farmland inequality in the Prairies poses problems for all Canadians

Farm consolidation, increasing land concentration and expanding investor ownership of farmland is leading to growing land inequality in the Canadian Prairies.
In this photo provided by the U.S. navy, sailors recover a high-altitude surveillance balloon off the coast of Myrtle Beach, S.C., on Feb. 5, 2023. A missile was fired by a U.S. F-22 off the Carolina coast to bring the balloon down. (U.S. Navy via AP)

NORAD’s value is on full display as flying objects shot down over North America

If there’s any silver lining to the aerial objects being shot down over North America over the last few days, maybe it’s that North Americans will recognize and appreciate the binational NORAD.

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