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Articles on food industry

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Tipping, a popular cultural practice in Canada, can have hidden consequences for food service workers. (Shutterstock)

At the tipping point: It’s time to include tips in menu prices as restaurants reopen from COVID lockdowns

Tipping has often-overlooked consequences for food service workers. The industry should turn its attention to underlying issues if it wants to ensure a sustainable future.
Volunteers prepare boxes at the Greater Boston Food Bank on Oct. 1, 2020. Iaritza Menjivar, The Washington Post via Getty Images

Corporate concentration in the US food system makes food more expensive and less accessible for many Americans

Food production in the US is heavily concentrated in the hands of a small number of large agribusiness companies. That’s been good for shareholders, but not for consumers.
While there’s no evidence COVID-19 can be spread through food, companies must weigh the risks all the same. Kryssia Campos/Getty Images

Coronavirus impact: Meat processing plants weigh risks of prosecution if they’re blamed for spreading infection

While there’s no evidence the coronavirus is spread through food or packaging, company executives could be prosecuted if that changes – and they chose to keep a plant open despite a factory outbreak.
Don’t shun processed or ultra-processed foods entirely. Not only do they save families time and money, many processed foods have been unfairly maligned and can be nutritious as well as economical and convenient. (Shutterstock)

In defence of ‘ultra-processed’ foods

Processed foods can be nutritious as well as economical and convenient. So let’s stop demonizing processed foods, and ease up on those who turn to them for convenience and price.
Five people died and more than 200 got sick during a 2018 E. coli outbreak, the largest in more than a decade. The bacteria was traced to contaminated romaine lettuce. (Shutterstock)

Grocers: Get ready to join the blockchain party

With Walmart bringing blockchain technology to its grocery stores, other retailers will soon have to get on board.
You’re not imagining things. The quantities of packaged foods really are shrinking as food manufacturers try to avoid hiking prices. Shrinkflation however is beginning to irritate consumers who feel they’re being cheated. (Shutterstock)

Shrinkflation: When less is not more at the grocery store

Canadians are bargain-hunters when it comes to food, and so food manufacturers try to keep prices low. But does that mean they should engage in ‘shrinkflation?’

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