Articles on Seagrass

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Recent marine heatwaves have devastated crucial coastal habitats, including kelp forests, seagrass meadows and coral reefs. Dan Smale

Suffering in the heat: the rise in marine heatwaves is harming ocean species

Marine heatwaves, like their land counterparts, are growing hotter and longer. Sea species in southeastern Australia, southeast Asia, northwestern Africa, Europe and eastern Canada are most at risk.
Shark Bay was hit by a brutal marine heatwave in 2011. W. Bulach/Wikimedia Commons

Shark Bay: A World Heritage Site at catastrophic risk

Everyone knows the Great Barrier Reef is in peril. But a continent away, Western Australia's Shark Bay is also threatened by marine heatwaves that could alter this World Heritage ecosystem forever.
Nature’s bank vault. Julius Glampedakis

Seagrass, protector of shipwrecks and buried treasure

The sediments that accumulate beneath seagrass meadows can act as secure vaults for shipwrecks and other precious artefacts, by stopping water and oxygen from damaging the delicate timbers.
Green sea turtle eating seagrass off Lizard Island. Abbi Scott

Dugong and sea turtle poo sheds new light on the Great Barrier Reef’s seagrass meadows

New research highlights the role of sea turtles and dugong in the dispersal of seeds and maintenance of seagrass meadows, an important marine habitat and the primary food source for both animals.
Shark Bay is one of Australia’s 19 World Heritage Areas, home to dolphins, dugongs, and sharks. Matthew Fraser

Climate change threatens Western Australia’s iconic Shark Bay

In the summer of 2010-2011 Western Australia experienced an unprecedented heatwave — but not on land. Between December 2010 and April 2011, sea temperatures off the WA coast reached 3C above average, and…
Australia’s seagrass could earn A$35 million in carbon credits each year, if we have a trading scheme. sandwichgirl/Flickr

Seagrass is a huge carbon store, but will government value it?

Australia is surrounded by a thin green line of seagrass meadows potentially worth A$5.4 billion on international carbon markets, and which could contribute to Australia and other nations meeting carbon…

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