Menu Close

Articles on Aboriginal Land Rights

Displaying 1 - 20 of 22 articles

Cortlan Bennett/AAP

A history of destruction: why the WA Aboriginal cultural heritage bill will not prevent another Juukan Gorge-like disaster

Western Australia’s Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Bill 2021 is set to become law. But the new legislation states one elected official will decide whether heritage sites are destroyed for development.
Cape York. Dave Hunt/AAP Image

Australia has a heritage conservation problem. Can farming and Aboriginal heritage protection co-exist?

How can we improve the management of Queensland’s heritage sites? Can farming and the conservation of Aboriginal heritage co-exist?
For over six weeks, Wangan and Jagalingou Traditional Owners have been performing continuous cultural ceremony at the edge of Adani’s Carmichael mine in central Queensland. Leah Light Photography

When native title fails: First Nations people are turning to human rights law to keep access to cultural sites

Recently Queensland police recognised the cultural rights of Wangan and Jagalingou people to conduct ceremony under provisions of a Human Rights Act. What does this mean for other Traditional Owners?
PKKP and PKKP Aboriginal Corporation/AAP

Fixing Australia’s shocking record of Indigenous heritage destruction: Juukan inquiry offers a way forward

The A Way Forward report addresses the issues of cultural heritage protection in Australia after Rio Tinto destroyed Juukan Gorge. However, achieving change will be far from straightforward.
Uncle Fred Deeral as little old man in the film The Message, by Zakpage, to be shown at the National Museum of Australia in April. Nik Lachajczak of Zakpage

An honest reckoning with Captain Cook’s legacy won’t heal things overnight. But it’s a start

An honest reckoning with Captain Cook’s legacy won’t heal things overnight. But it’s a start. The Conversation41.4 MB (download)
The impact of 1770 has never eased for Aboriginal people. It was a collision of catastrophic proportions.
Constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australians has stalled. It’s time to take a new approach. Alan Porritt/AAP

A new way to recognise an Indigenous nation in Australia

A federal system could deliver on three of the four key elements of the Uluru Statement. Plus, all the elements already exist or are in the works in Australia.
The Timber Creek claim is being seen as a test case for future Indigenous land rights compensation claims. Maleika Halpin/CrowdSpark

How will Indigenous people be compensated for lost native title rights? The High Court will soon decide

The decision will have huge implications for Indigenous peoples who have lost their land rights and for state and territory governments that may be liable for compensation.
‘The Block’ in Redfern has been a site of struggle and activism for Indigenous inclusion in planning processes. AAP Image/Paul Miller

Indigenous communities are reworking urban planning, but planners need to accept their history

While planning policies and practices have contributed to marginalising Indigenous people, planners can now work with them to ensure they have their rightful say in shaping Australian communities.
The Tent Embassy in Canberra has for decades been symbolic of the tensions in Australian cities about recognition, reconciliation and land justice. Dylan Wood/AAP

How can we meaningfully recognise cities as Indigenous places?

Imagine if we did urban development in a way that honours Indigenous histories, knowledge and relationships with those places.
Vincent Lingiari looks on as Prime Minister Gough Whitlam swigs champagne after the symbolic handback of the Gurindji people’s land. Rob Wesley-Smith

An historic handful of dirt: Whitlam and the legacy of the Wave Hill Walk-Off

A new book reveals the drama and comedy of Prime Minister Gough Whitlam’s famous “hand back” of Gurindji land in 1975, following the Wave Hill Walk-Off 50 years ago – and the bittersweet aftermath.
Gurindji ranger Ursula Chubb pays her respects to ancestors killed in the early 1900s at Blackfella Creek, where children were tied with wire and dragged by horses, and adults were shot as they fled. They were buried under rocks where they fell. Brenda L Croft, from Yijarni

Friday essay: the untold story behind the 1966 Wave Hill Walk-Off

The Gurindji people of the Northern Territory made history 50 years ago by standing up for their rights to land and better pay. But a new book reveals the deeper story behind the Wave Hill Walk-Off.

Top contributors

More