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A re-imagined production of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town was cancelled five days before opening. Anne-Louise Sarks

A litany of losses: a new project maps our abandoned arts events of 2020

In a year of lockdowns, The Impossible Project gives life to shows that never reached the stage. More than 150 events are listed on this online archive, and sadly, more are likely to come.
Jeanette W. Jones holds the September 1957 issue of Ebony magazine, which features the article ‘Mystery People of Baltimore: Neither red, nor black, nor white. Strange ‘Indian’ tribe lives in world of its own.’ She is pictured at center, with her hand on her hip. Photo Sean Scheidt; author provided

Repatriating the archives: Lumbee scholars find their people and bring them home

Two Lumbee scholars who have mined local archives in search of tribal history raise the profound question: Who has the rights to memories and artifacts of their people's past?
Canada lags behind some countries with preserving public digital records. (Flickr/BiblioArchives / LibraryArchives Canada)

2020 is a year for the history books, but not without digital archives

Policymakers should mandate Canada's national library to archive the entire Canadian web domain so future reserachers can make sense of 2020 and ongoing responses to the pandemic.
The archives of academic institutions can tell previously untold stories of eugenics. Universities can begin to undo oppressive legacies by opening them to artists and communities. (Pakula Piotr/Shutterstock)

Universities must open their archives and share their oppressive pasts

To confront colonialism, universities must open their archives and let communities see their pasts, eugenics and all.
A looted Jewish shop in Aachen, Germany on the day after Kristallnacht, Nov. 10, 1938. Wolf Gruner and Armin Nolzen (eds.). 'Bürokratien: Initiative und Effizienz,' Berlin, 2001.

The forgotten mass destruction of Jewish homes during ‘Kristallnacht’

Most histories highlight the shattered storefronts and synagogues set aflame. But it was the systematic ransacking of Jewish homes that extracted the greatest toll.
What to do with our old paper medical files now that records are going digital? As a recent Brisbane case demonstrates, not all files are heading straight for destruction. from www.shutterstock.com

Paper tsunami: how the move to digital medical records is leaving us drowning in old paper files

Patient information dumped on the side of the road in Brisbane recently has raised the issue of how hospitals and clinics manage their old paper records.
Idi Amin at a press conference in Jjaja Marina, Uganda in July 1975. Courtesy of the Uganda Broadcasting Corporation

Thousands of recently discovered photographs document life in Uganda during Idi Amin’s reign

Hidden for decades in a vault at the Uganda Broadcasting Corporation, the photographs depict a regime fixated on establishing order, meting out punishment and stoking nationalism.
The National Museum of Iraq photographed in February 2018. Many of the pieces discovered at the ruins of Ur, arranged and labelled by Ennigaldi-Nanna, can be found here. Wikimedia Commons

Hidden women of history: Ennigaldi-Nanna, curator of the world’s first museum

Ennigaldi-Nanna is largely unknown in the modern day. But in 530BC, this Mesopotamian priestess worked to arrange and label various artefacts in the world's first museum.
The internet is growing, but old information continues to disappear daily. wk1003mike/shutterstock.com

Your internet data is rotting

MySpace users were recently shocked to learn that the company lost 50 million user files. It's a harsh lesson in not leaving your intellectual property unprotected on the information superhighway.

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