Articles on Breast Cancer

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Mamming involves resting breasts on a flat surface and taking a photo. Ondra Anderle

#mamming meme opens young women up to screening harms

Social media can help raise awareness of health issues, engaging people in discussion and encouraging them to take action. But thoughtless adherence to such trends has the potential to cause harm. New…
The predictive tool might help women make decisions about changing their lifestyle. Image from shutterstock.com

Tool to predict women’s cancer risk could prompt lifestyle changes

Researchers in the United States have developed a new model to predict women’s risk of developing breast, uterine and ovarian cancer, based on individual lifestyle factors. These three cancers make up…
There’s a deep uncertainty about both the benefits and the harms of breast cancer screening as it is practiced today. Tips Times/Flickr

Growing uncertainty about breast cancer screening

When they were introduced over 20 years ago, national breast screening programs were a milestone in public health. They were based on evidence from randomised trials that screening saved lives. But there…

Hope against breast cancer

There is new hope in the fight against breast cancer. Scientists have found that silencing the BCL-2 gene in oestrogen receptor…
The new compound, when combined with conventional drugs, has shown promising early results in the treatment of some types of breast cancer, tests on mice showed. http://www.flickr.com/photos/topekalibrary

Found: a new drug mix to nix breast cancer

Combining a special anti-cancer compound with conventional cancer-fighting drugs can slow down the growth of the most common…
Angelina Jolie has a double mastectomy after discovering she carried a mutation of the BRAC1 gene. Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

Supreme Court BRCA patenting decision: experts respond

Millions of women in the US will have access to affordable genetic screening for cancer after the US Supreme Court ruled that a commercial company cannot patent human genes. The screening tests for mutations…
Angelina Jolie’s double mastectomy has sparked a series of reports about preventative surgery. PA/Alastair Grant

Greater access to genetic testing in NHS will help cancer fight

Following Hollywood actress Angelina Jolie’s revelation last week that she’d undergone a double mastectomy to prevent breast cancer, it has emerged that a 53-year-old man had his prostate removed after…
The harms from over-diagnosis and over-treatment mean that not everyone benefits from breast cancer screening. Ian Hunter

Breast cancer screening needs to make more than economic sense

A recent article in The Conversation’s Health Rationing series endorsed the government’s decision to extend the BreastScreen program to women aged 70 to 74 (from 50 to 69), based on the results of a 2009…
Angelina Jolie should be seen as a model for seeking information about her options and making a decision that best suited her. EPA/Facundo Arrizabalaga

Panicking about breast cancer? Here’s what you need to know

Angelina Jolie’s recent announcement about her double mastectomy likely caused many women to think about their own chance of developing breast cancer. But before you rush off to have a bunch of possibly…
Women whose partners accepted their bodily changes after cancer are more likely to feel positive and sexy. Christophe Karaba/EPA

Sex, sexuality and cancer: let’s break the taboo

Angelina Jolie has attracted much attention for revealing her recent experience of a double mastectomy. But her personal attractiveness draws attention to a neglected aspect of cancer treatment and survival…
American actress Angelina Jolie has had a double mastectomy because she carries the faulty gene BRCA1. EPA/FACUNDO ARRIZABALAGA

Angelina Jolie has had a double mastectomy, so what is BRCA1?

Actress Angelina Jolie’s op-ed in the New York Times explained that she opted to have a double mastectomy because she carries the hereditary BRCA1 gene, which she says increases her risk of breast cancer…
Triple negative breast cancer accounts for one-fifth of breast cancers and usually affects younger women. Image from shutterstock.com

New therapy holds promise for aggressive breast cancers

Australian researchers have developed a new therapy to treat a common and aggressive form of breast cancer and stop the disease…
The vast majority of us will never be exposed to aluminium in high enough concentrations to do damage. ezioman/Flickr

Does aluminium cause Alzheimer’s and breast cancer?

Silvery, ductile, malleable and so very, very useful, aluminium is the most common metal in the Earth’s crust. But despite its importance (or perhaps because of it), there are fears that this metal causes…
The BRCA1 gene is thought to account for 45% of hereditary breast cancer, and at least 80% of hereditary cancer involving both breast and ovarian cancers. Tips Times

Gene patenting: Australian court rules BRCA1 patent is legal

“The issue that arises in this case is of considerable importance. It relates to the patentability of genes, or gene sequences, and the practice of gene patenting”. So began the reasons for judgement of…
Based on the evidence, it’s safe to dismiss this one as a myth. Flickr/lism

Monday’s medical myth: deodorants cause breast cancer

The concern that using deodorants and antiperspirants might increase the risk of breast cancer has been around for around for at least 15 years, probably longer. The theory suggests that either parabens…
Even without routine mammographs, women with a family history of the disease should be screened. Zanthia

Is routine breast cancer screening doing more harm than good?

Public discussion about the risks of over-diagnosis of breast cancer have left some women wondering whether they should take part in the government’s breast screening program. Let’s take a look at what…

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