Articles on COVID-19 myths

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Seeing is believing: how media mythbusting can actually make false beliefs stronger

Instead of debunking false claims, psychology shows promoting the facts is a more effective way to fight the spread of misinformation.
No matter the details of the plot, conspiracy theories follow common patterns of thought. Ranta Images/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Coronavirus, ‘Plandemic’ and the seven traits of conspiratorial thinking

Conspiracy theories about COVID-19, such as those advanced in the video 'Plandemic,' tend to pull from the same playbook. Recognizing that can help keep you from falling for this kind of thinking.
Americans have been advised to keep six feet away from everyone else when they can’t stay home. Nur Photo/Getty Images

Math misconceptions may lead people to underestimate the true threat of COVID-19

Comparing death tolls between COVID-19 and the flu is the wrong way to gauge which disease is a bigger threat, according to researchers who study how people understand math.
FOX News host Sean Hannity (pictured here in 2018) gave credibility to a tweet he read out lout on his popular syndicated radio show, which called COVID-19 a fraud “to spread panic in the populace, manipulate the economy and suppress dissent.” AP/Julie Jacobson

Coronavirus ‘cures’ for $170 and other hoaxes: Why some people believe them

Why have conspiracy theories so easily circulated during the COVID-19 pandemic? What do these theories tell us about societies and what challenges do they present?

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