Memory

articles 1 to 20 of 73

This sign might actually be appealing to treasure hunters in the distant future. Alan English CPA/Flickr

Three problems with the way we think about nuclear power

Our natural difficulties in thinking about the future, low probabilities and considering risk make many of our views about nuclear power problematic.
The answer is a resounding no – brains are more sophisticated than that. Dmitry Kirsanov/Flickr

Health Check: can your brain be ‘full’?

The brain is truly a marvel. A seemingly endless library, whose shelves house our most precious memories as well as our lifetime's knowledge. But is there a point where it reaches capacity?
You can do a lot while you sleep. Woman via www.shutterstock.com.

Can we unlearn social biases while we sleep?

We strengthen memories while we sleep, and researchers have found a way to cue that process to help people better retain information that counters implicit biases.
Memory makes us human but also sometimes inhumane. Trung Bui Viet

What Ishiguro’s Buried Giant tells us about memory

Though Kazuo Ishiguro makes us wonder whether remembering is really better than forgetting, he also makes it clear that the answer is irrelevant. Remembering is our fate.
It’s hard for kids to remember a string of arbitrary numbers. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Here’s how to get kids to remember times tables

Lots of kids have trouble remembering their times tables. Learning them by rote can mean a child knows the numbers but not what they mean.
Selma director and co-writer Ava DuVernay has crafted a new and important vision of an oft-examined era in our nation’s history. Stanley Wolfson/Library of Congress

Selma blurs line between past and present

Hollywood films that depict American history deeply influence our sense of national identity. Films that portray Civil Rights and Black Freedom history are particularly important. Beyond entertaining moviegoers…
Do you forget a subject’s content as soon as the exam is over? Or forget a language once you’ve stopped using it? It’s not gone, you might just need something to retrieve it. Shutterstock

What happens in the brain when you no longer need the information you’ve learnt?

Throughout our lives we have multitudes of experiences that shape how we then behave in the world. Some of these lessons are learnt rapidly, such as why we shouldn’t put our hand on a hot pan on the stove…
Sharing stories around the dinner table fosters greater self-esteem and resilience in young people. Howard Chalkley

‘Remember when we…?’ Why sharing memories is soul food

Families and friends share memories all the time; “You’ll never guess…”, “How was your day?”, and “Do you remember when…” are rich daily fodder. Sharing memories is not only a good way to debrief and reminisce…
Police often rely on witnesses to finger the right guy, but eyewitnesses are far from perfect. Lineup image via www.shutterstock.com.

Vagaries of memory mean eyewitness testimony isn’t perfect

Twenty eyewitnesses testified before the grand jury investigating the police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. None of these accounts is fully consistent with any other. Moreover, eyewitnesses…
The podcast Serial investigates the murder of 18-year-old American student Hae Min Lee 15 years ago. LukaTDB/Shutterstock

Serial: murder, mystery and the science of memory

Can you recall what you were doing last Wednesday between 2.15pm and 2.36pm? Where were you? What did you see? Who did you talk to? How well do you remember those 21 minutes? Now try to recall Wednesday…

Top contributors

More