Articles on Indigenous

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Uluru at sunset at the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in the Northern Territory. AAP

Why we are banning tourists from climbing Uluru

The Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park Board of management has this week announced that tourists will be banned from climbing Uluru from 2019. Sammy Wilson, chairman of the park board, explains why.
Many homes in remote Indigenous communities rely on wood or diesel for heating. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Clean energy can advance Indigenous reconciliation

More than 200 remote communities in Canada rely on diesel fuel for energy. Cleaner options could fuel a better quality of life.
Métis Family and a Red River Cart, 1883. (State Historical Society of North Dakota, A4365)

Becoming Indigenous: The rise of Eastern Métis in Canada

New census data sheds light on the country's Indigenous population. In Eastern Canada, the rise in people claiming to be “Métis” is a controversial case of "settler self-indigenization."
Many women are released from prison with untreated mental and physical health problems, and no access to a doctor. In pain, they seek solace in illicit drugs. Pictured here, women mourn those who have died of drug overdose in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Women need health and dental care to stay out of prison

A staggering 70 per cent of female inmates are back in prison within two years of their release. Basic health and dental care could help change this, according to new research.
Indigenous Australians use ochre to add colour and detail to items such as this shield at the South Australian Museum. Image courtesy of South Australian Museum

When bacteria tell a story: tracing Indigenous Australian ochre sources via microbial ‘fingerprinting’

Ochre is more than just paint - it tells stories of culture and trade in Indigenous Australians. Using museum artefacts plus science can track ochre sources and untangle a lost history.
Marine waters are an important source of food for Inuit. (Judith Slein/Flickr)

Rocket debris is a risk to Inuit food security

The North Water Polynya, or Pikialasorsuag, is a key ocean area for Arctic animals and for Inuit hunting and fishing. Rocket launches threaten to contaminate the area with harmful chemicals.
Demonstrators at a 2010 Toronto rally protesting the mercury contamination of the Wabigoon-English waterway in northwestern Ontario carry long blue banners meant to represent a river. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)

Declaring a water crisis over isn’t the end of the ordeal

The declared end of Flint, Mich., contaminated water crisis echoes similar claims worldwide. Evidence shows victims of past and ongoing water crises, especially Indigenous people, continue to suffer.
Residential school survivor Lorna Standingready is comforted by a fellow survivor during the closing ceremony of the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

How I am learning to include Indigenous knowledge in the classroom

"What have we failed to know and at what cost?" An education professor draws upon Indigenous literature to support a personal journey into classroom decolonization.
Community-led research in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Labrador, helped identify dirty water containers as a source of drinking water contamination.

Collaboration can help in the Indigenous water crisis

Can community-led research help address Canada's Indigenous water security issues? One project from the Inuit community of Rigolet in Labrador suggests it can.
The Scream, by Kent Monkman (2016), is part of a traveling exhibition this year on colonized Canada: Shame And Prejudice: A Story Of Resilience. Kent Monkman

All mouth and no ears: Settlers with Opinions

A leading Indigenous academic says too many Canadians take ugly pleasure in being ignorant about Indigenous issues. It's time for some straight talk about Settlers with Opinions.
Canada’s former prime minister, Stephen Harper, is greeted by a Maori warrior in New Zealand in November 2014. New Zealand’s electoral system allows for far greater Indigenous involvement than Canada’s. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Lessons for Canada in New Zealand’s Indigenous-friendly electoral system

As New Zealanders head to the polls this week, there are lessons for Canada in the country's electoral system — in particular how it gives Indigenous people a greater role in governing.
The federal government is renaming the Langevin Block building on Parliament Hill out of respect for Indigenous peoples. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Instead of renaming buildings, why not truly improve Indigenous lives?

The Langevin Block on Parliament Hill is being renamed out of respect for Indigenous people. But instead of renaming buildings, let's offer meaningful change to the Indigenous.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and President of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami Natan Obed talk as they overlook Iqaluit, Nunavut in February. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Romantic notions about the Arctic must include Indigenous rights

The Arctic plays a big role in Canada's national identity. But as Canada's relationship with the region evolves, the interests of Indigenous peoples must be better-represented.
The Madjedbebe excavation in the Northern Territory. Dominic O Brien/Gundjeihmi Aboriginal Corporation

Buried tools and pigments tell a new history of humans in Australia for 65,000 years

A new study pushes back the first known evidence of human activity in Australia – to 65,000 years ago.

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