Articles on Aboriginal heritage

Displaying all articles

The Tent Embassy in Canberra has for decades been symbolic of the tensions in Australian cities about recognition, reconciliation and land justice. Dylan Wood/AAP

How can we meaningfully recognise cities as Indigenous places?

Imagine if we did urban development in a way that honours Indigenous histories, knowledge and relationships with those places.
Professor Eske Willerslev talks to Aboriginal elders in the Kalgoorlie area in southwestern Australia. Preben Hjort, Mayday Film

DNA reveals a new history of the First Australians

New DNA research working with Indigenous Australians is answering many of the questions about when and where the First Australians emerged many thousands of years ago.
The original excavation of Mungo Man, found near Lake Mungo in southwestern New South Wales, Australia. Wilfred Shawcross.

New DNA study confirms ancient Aborigines were the First Australians

Research first published in 2001 has been used to question of whether Aboriginal People were the First Australians. So why not re-test those results with improved techniques and equipment?
Koori women Treahna Hamm, Vicki Couzens and Lee Darroch wear ‘Biaganga’, traditional possum coats at the Melbourne Museum’s Aboriginal Cultural Centre in Melbourne. Julian Smith/AAP

How living museums are ‘waking up’ sleeping artefacts

Museums are cracking open the temperature-controlled, dehumidified display cases and inviting people in. Working with Aboriginal communities is reawakening cultural connections and ancient art forms.
Whose story are you telling? Neil Armfield’s The Secret River is a chronicle of colonialism. The Sydney Theatre Company/Heidrun Löhr

The Secret River, silences and our nation’s history

The stage version of The Secret River gives us a deeper sense of our history. But can understanding the past from different perspectives help us confront the inequalities that linger in our present?
Australia’s Aboriginal welfare problem of the 60s enabled widespread theft from Indigenous artists – including designs for the one dollar note. Reserve Bank of Australia.

‘Dollar Dave’ and the Reserve Bank: a tale of art, theft and human rights

Australia's original $1 note featured artwork taken without permission from Aboriginal artist, David Malangi. He was later given $1000, a medallion and a fishing kit, but archival evidence sheds new light on the affair.
There are some simple principles that would strengthen Aboriginal heritage protection. Monkey Mia, Shark Bay in Western Australia. Grant Matthews

Four ways Western Australia can improve Aboriginal heritage management

Aboriginal heritage has had significant protections removed in Western Australia. Following principles of respect and consultation would be a huge step forward for Aboriginal cultural management.
The British Museum owns a number of priceless pieces of Aboriginal art, and claim they’re the best possible home for Australian heritage items. Paul Hudson

Dja Dja Wurrung barks are Australian art – the British Museum should return them

The Dja Dja Warrung bark etchings are hugely significant Aboriginal artefacts. They're back in Australia for only the second time in 160 years. We look at the complex issue of repatriation.
More than 3,000 Aboriginal sites have lost registration status as part of sweeping changes in classifications in the Aboriginal Heritage Register. Domes of Purnululu, Western Australia. Pic: David Denicolò

Separate but unequal: the sad fate of Aboriginal heritage in Western Australia

More than 3,000 Aboriginal heritage sites in Western Australia have lost registration status as part of sweeping changes in classifications in the Aboriginal Heritage Register. That needs to change.
The 40,000-year-old remains of Mungo Man were discovered in 1974 on the southern sector of the eroding Lake Mungo shoreline. Jim Bowler

Mungo Man moves to National Museum, but he’s still not home

The remains of the Aboriginal man who lived more than 40,000 years ago are on the move again. But they're still not returning home, to the place where they were discovered four decades ago.
‘Children who are yet to be born need to know their place in the never-ending story.’ Warangkula family portrait alongside Warangkula Court street sign. Photo: Helen Puckey

Streets of Papunya delivers an artistic renaissance worth celebrating

Succeeding generations need to know where they are placed in the unfolding grand narrative of Aboriginal art. Those of us who are not Aboriginal need to understand the complex relationship between settler Australians and the people of the land.
Adam Goodes continues to demonstrate through dignity and presence of mind, that he is an empowered Aboriginal man. AAP Image/Paul Miller

Adam Goodes, dignity and Aboriginal men: what the research says

Adam Goodes' actions – from his celebratory dance to his decision to temporarily withdraw from the AFL – epitomise the concept of male Indigenous dignity.
Many threats – the lower paintings at this site at Malarrak in Arnhem Land are being removed by feral animals rubbing against the wall. Paul Tacon

Australian rock art is threatened by a lack of conservation

Australian rock art is under threat from both natural and cultural forces impacting on sites. But what saddens me the most is that there is so much government lethargy in Australia when it comes to documenting…

Top contributors

More