Articles on Depression

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One in 3 people with severe depression do not respond to treatment. TZIDO SUN/Shutterstock.com

Promising new drug for treatment-resistant depression – esketamine

A safety committee convened by the FDA has declared esketamine safe for severe depression. But isn't this drug the same as ketamine, an illegal street drug? A medical anthropologist explains.
Perfectionism often develops in childhood, is impacted by parenting and can lead to mental health struggles in later life. (Shutterstock)

Young people drowning in a rising tide of perfectionism

New research shows that perfectionism has increased dramatically over the last 25 years, and that perfectionists become more neurotic and less conscientious as time passes.
Eating a healthy diet fuels our brain cells, fights inflammation and helps produce the chemicals that make us happy. Antor Paul

Want to improve your mood? It’s time to ditch the junk food

Medication and talking therapies are key to treating depression but eating a range of nutritious foods can also play a role in boosting our mood.
Currently only half of people with depression access potentially adequate treatment, according to one research study. Digital devices could help. (Unsplash/boudewijn huysmans)

The future of psychiatry promises to be digital – from apps that track your mood to smartphone therapy

Using smartphones and wearable devices to identify mental health symptoms and deliver psychotherapy will allow more people to access quality care, according to one psychiatrist.
Body ideals can often lead gay men into feelings of inadequacy, low self-esteem and depression. The photographer captioned this image, ‘You just want to go in the fetal position and you kind of feel alone.’ (Moe)

How body ideals shape the health of gay men

In this photography-based research project, gay men document their struggles with body image, and challenge current beauty standards.
Clinical research has established exercise as a safe and effective intervention to counteract the adverse physical and psychological effects of cancer and its treatment. The Clinical Oncology Society of Australia is the first to recommend exercise as part of regular cancer care. (Unsplash/curtis macnewton)

Exercise is medicine, and doctors are starting to prescribe it

From weekend walks with your doctor to free gym memberships, there is a global movement afoot.
Antidepressants bring in almost $17 billion a year for the pharmaceutical industry, and yet science shows their benefit to be small. Natural therapies such as diet, exercise, light therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy are just as effective. (Shutterstock)

Why natural depression therapies are better than pills

These four “natural” therapies for depression have rigorous, peer-reviewed scientific studies to support their use.
Screening tools are available to help health practitioners and individuals to detect mental health problems. But Indonesia still needs to ensure people with mental health problems are treated. www.shutterstock.com

260 million people and less than 1000 psychiatrists, Indonesia’s mental health worker shortage

Indonesia should start investing in mental health care and ensuring that each Puskesmas has enough human resources to detect, treat and care for people with mental disorders.

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