Articles on MAID

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Australian scientist David Goodall photographed in Basel, Switzerland, on May 8, 2018 ended his life in with assisted suicide. (AP Photo/Jamey Keaten)

‘Suicide tourism’ and understanding the Swiss model of the right to die

Recent stories in the media highlight the idea of suicide tourism to Switzerland. But what does that mean? How is the Swiss view of assisted dying different from the Canadian one?
The province of Nova Scotia is leading the way in defining the terms of Canada’s ambiguous law on medically assisted dying. Here Liana Brittain is seen in Halifax in front of a projection of her late husband Paul B. Couvrette, who received a medically assisted death in P.E.I. on Sept. 15, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

Can we die? The seriously ill need clarity

In Nova Scotia, it's clearer now who qualifies for medical assistance in dying. Will the other provinces and territories follow suit?
In one study of seriously ill older Canadians, 28 per cent of participants wanted “comfort care” (meaning no curative treatments) but this was documented in only four per cent of their charts. (Shutterstock)

Poor communication is compromising care for the dying

Most elderly Canadians do not receive the end-of-life care they desire. A new study hopes to rectify this.
Medical assistance in dying has been legal in Canada since July 2016, but there are no ‘specialists’ responsible for doctor-assisted suicide and many doctors are overwhelmed with requests. (Shutterstock)

Who will be the doctors of death in a time of assisted suicide?

More than 2,000 Canadians have chosen medical assistance in dying (MAID) since legalization in 2016. But palliative care doctors aren't embracing assisted suicide as part of their job.

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